It is about time...


Tech worker groups boycott IBM, Infosys, Manpower

Advocacy groups say the companies should look first for U.S. tech workers for U.S. IT jobs

Grant Gross

June 2, 2014 (IDG News Service)

Three U.S. tech worker groups have launched a labor boycott of IBM, Infosys and Manpower, saying the companies have engaged in a pattern that discourages U.S. workers from applying for U.S. IT jobs by tailoring employment ads toward overseas workers.

The companies should look first for U.S. workers to fill U.S. IT jobs, said representatives of Bright Future Jobs, the Programmers Guild and WashTech.

With the boycott, the three groups want to raise awareness of discriminatory hiring practices and put pressure on the three companies to consider U.S. IT workers for U.S. jobs, said Donna Conroy, director of Bright Future Jobs.

The main goals of the boycott are "attention getting" and putting pressure on the IT staffing firms to change their practices, Conroy said. With IT staffing agencies competing to fill U.S. positions, the companies contracting for their services may want to consider if the staffing firm "has a good reputation," she said.

The boycott should also raise concerns about staffing firms violating equal employment laws, said Les French, president of WashTech. "In addition to calling attention to an illegal practice, we want to show there are valid challenges to the 'labor shortage' of STEM workers," French said in an email.

An Infosys spokeswoman disputed the charges that it avoids recruiting U.S. IT workers.

"It is incorrect to allude that we exclude or discourage U.S. workers," she said by email. "Today, we are recruiting for over 440 active openings across 20 states in the U.S."

Many of the positions target people who have a U.S. master's degree in business administration for sales and management consultant jobs, she said. "The graduate hiring program is a key investment to strengthen our future leadership pool," she added. "Attracting the best and brightest talent is paramount to Infosys success."

The company's external job posts give "everyone an equal opportunity to apply," she added. The company supports several minority advocacy groups, she said.

Representatives from IBM and Manpower didn't respond to requests for comment on the boycott.

In some cases, a Manpower subsidiary has advertised for Indian IT workers to come to the U.S. for openings anticipated more than a year in advance, said Conroy, author of a white paper, released last week, that is focused on Manpower's IT recruitment efforts in India.

The advertisements in India are being placed even though "most Americans believe the nature of the tech industry is so fast-paced that staffing projections cannot be adequately foreseen," she said.

Meanwhile, Manpower is not advertising for U.S. IT positions on U.S. job portals, Conroy said. But if Manpower advertised in the U.S. using the same lead time it is using in India, it would give companies "plenty of time to seek Americans first."

In November 2013, Manpower subsidiary Experis IT India advertised in India for an OpenStack engineer for a U.S. position, Bright Future Jobs noted. "We are now hiring young, dynamic, skilled and experienced IT professionals from India to work with us in the U.S.," the ad said.

Other Experis IT India ads in late 2013 talked about the company filling out H-1B worker visa applications for job applicants, with one ad saying "all expenses related to your visa filing would be take care of" by Manpower.

The three tech workers groups also plan to launch an educational effort aimed at helping U.S. tech workers recognize discriminatory job ads and questions during job interviews, Conroy said. "When people are educated, there will likely be more lawsuits" related to discriminatory employment practices, she said.

Rajiv Dabhadkar, the founder of the National Organization for Software and Technology Professionals, a national tech advocacy organization in India, said he supports the boycott.

Indian employers show a "strong preference" for Indian IT workers, Dabhadkar said. He questioned why U.S. companies don't do the same thing.

The boycott "will protect the Indian foreign workers from the accusation of displacing Americans," he said. "Indians were not put on this earth to displace Americans, but Manpower's recruiting efforts show this is their plan."

Segregated recruiting opens the door to "unscrupulous agents" who make false promises to Indian IT workers, he added.

"The brokerage of intellectual capital drives down wages, and foreign workers are under paid," Dabhadkar said by email. "Multiple layers of broker agencies, that earn a per hour commission of their visa-sponsored employee creates a grey market."

Importing foreign workers to the U.S. as a commodity violates human rights, he added. "American employers gain competitive advantage and profitability by labor arbitrage, by paying low to their sponsored workers, and bidding high to their clients," Dabhadkar said.

Grant Gross covers technology and telecom policy in the U.S. government for The IDG News Service. Follow Grant on Twitter at GrantGross. Grant's email address is

Tunnel Rat posted on April 29, 2014 10:19

American Insurgents have known about this for years!

Silicon Valley’s Giants Are Just Gilded Age Tycoons in Techno-Utopian Clothes

The $300 million payout from tech giants like Google and Apple to settle a lawsuit brought by employees makes it clear that Silicon Valley is out for profit, not to change the world.

Silicon Valley’s biggest names—Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe—reached a settlement today in a contentious $3 billion anti-trust suit brought by workers who accused the tech giants of secretly colluding to not recruit each other’s employees. The workers won, but not much, receiving only a rumored $300 million, a small fraction of the billions the companies might have been forced to pay had they been found guilty in a trial verdict. 

The criminality that the case exposed in the boardrooms the tech giants, including from revered figures like Steve Jobs who comes off as especially ruthless, should not be jarring to anyone familiar with Silicon Valley.  It may shock much of the media, who have generally genuflected towards these companies, and much of the public, that has been hoodwinked into thinking the Valley oligarchs represent a better kind of plutocrat—but the truth is they are a lot like the old robber barons...

...One might excuse the hagiographies prepared by the Valley’s ever expanding legion of public relations professionals, and their media allies,  but the ugly reality remains. The  Silicon Valley tech firms tend to be  every bit as cutthroat and greedy as any capitalist enterprise before it. We need to finally see the tech moguls not as a superior form of oligarch, but as just the latest in long line whose overweening ambition sometimes needs to be restrained, not just celebrated.




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Think I'll get a good reference?

Not that I care.  

I lasted 4 1/2 months at a place that turned out to be a frat-house.  Guys flashing porn pics, day trading, playing FPS in the open, screaming and cussing, and not a clue how to do software dev.  They tried put me full-time on a CMS project and I told them to shove it.  

Plenty of leads in the job market.  Three onsite interviews this week and a lot of calls.  Most interesting one was a well funded startup with an open-office.  I get led in, wearing my wing-tips and suit and tie, and see a guy in cargo shirts, t-shirt, and no shoes on, not even flip-flops.  Immediately took off my tie and sat there for four hours doing a gang bang of interviews.  Probably should have left after the manager in the first interview said she knew the manager at the place I just left.  I didn't flip her off, but I am sure that word got around :-)

But the open office thing is weird.  Too quiet and no privacy.  Anyway, got turned down today.

Then I interviewed with this Russian guy (I am pretty sure Russians hate Hungarians like me).  He started waving my resume around and saying "All these jobs, I don't like this!  I don't want someone who will be here 6 months and leave!!"  Douche.  And that guy also knew that same manager from my last place.  WTF? 

So those two gigs won't be happening.

But all of the sudden these assholes are calling me a job hopper because I've been consulting and contracting for the last 20 years.  Never mind that companies in the last 5-7 years have been downsizing, merging, and re-orging like crazy.

Anybody who has been at the same place for the last 5 years must be a serious ass-kisser and collaborator.

So, I've decided to go all slumdog on my resume.  Change dates, add bogus skills, hype and fabricate shit.  Nothing outrageous, like 25-yr. old Kumar with 15 years of ERP experience, but basic shit that I can BS past in an interview.  

The companies lie to us, so we need to do the same.  Maybe the slumdogs were on to something.



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Tunnel Rat posted on April 7, 2014 08:07

...resulting in a large amount of anti-H1B comments:

Wanted: Foreign workers. H-1B visa requests leap

Here are some good ones:

  • The ones who get degrees here are the worst! The entire purpose of the student visa is for people to study here then go back to their homeland to build up their native nations. NOT to stay in the US so they can live large. Such people are not only greedy and opportunistic, but unpatriotic and I believe that character should figure into immigration laws. What is the difference between a foreign STEM grad and an American STEM grad? Answer: the foreign STEM grad is taken by the hand and ushered into an extremely desirable American job. Whereas the American STEM grad has to move home and wait tables. This must end.


  • It is all about bringing in chaper labor from India . Does anyone really beleive that we don;t have the skilled labor in IT and acounting to do these jobs? If you do I have a bridge in NYC to sell you cheap. Its all about outsourcing to cheaper labor. Have to raise profits to keep investors happy. Can;t do it by 9increasing revenue so need to cut Laborl. Look at IBM . IN 10 years they have gone from over 200K employees in US to a target number of about 40K by 2015 yet the World wide number of employess is about flat. WHY ? Cheaper labor to grow profits. Look at the top 3 companies applying for the Visa.....they sure aren;t American companies and they sure do have access to some really cheap labor.


  • this is a perfect example of what these H1B d**cks do. They steal from each other in their own country, and then they come here and steal, and then they justify it by saying "everyone does it", so now stealing is ok, or they call it some fancy name like "globalization". They can't make their own country livable/it's filthy, so they come here and rob others, and then make it sound like everyone is a thief, like them. At least you're honest about how you all operate, I'll give you that.


  • Tech firms aren't even bothering to interview domestic candidates, despite the resume queues being full of them, before they hire foreigners. Its absolutely a travesty. Top grads can spend years sending out job applications not even to receive the basic courtesy of a response from many of those named employers.


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Tunnel Rat posted on March 6, 2014 13:31

This is what you get for turning your IT department over to the curry-scented wage pirates...

(AP) — Target Corp. (NYSE:TGT) Chief Information Officer Beth Jacob is resigning effective Wednesday as the retailer overhauls its information security and compliance division in the wake of a massive pre-Christmas data breach.

Target Chairman, President and CEO Gregg Steinhafel said in a statement released to The Associated Press that the company will search for an interim chief information officer who can help guide the company through the transformation.

Jacob had been in her current role since 2008 and oversaw teams in the U.S. and India.

Target disclosed on Dec. 19 that the data breach compromised 40 million credit and debit card accounts between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15. Then on Jan. 10 it said hackers also stole personal information — including names, phone numbers as well as email and mailing addresses — from as many as 70 million customers.



Tunnel Rat posted on February 28, 2014 13:50


Now that Microsoft has succumbed to a new Indian CEO (no don’t call them asians they are half negroid middle easterners) it’s fate is sealed, all it’s wealth and monopoly will be gone in five to ten years until sucked dry by Indians it will be no more than a decaying emaciated corpse rotting in the sun (just like Sun rotted after bringing on Indians!)...



India’s emerging market rollercoaster has been a brutal ride for IBM

...Other problems started to crop up. In the fiscal year to March, 2012, employees in IBM’s Indian software division unit inflated revenues by $8 million in order to meet financial targets. The company fired two dozen employees in India because of the fraud. In the fiscal year to March 2013, IBM detected another instance of fraud which overstated revenues by about $10 million, Livemint reported, citing documents filed with the Indian government...





...Indian outsourcing companies realized that they are dealing with an average America and not that rich America. American dollar fell, gold and oil prices rose. The economic decline of the super power was silent but catastrophic.

Today the flagging U.S. economy is the major reason why nearly 40,000 H-1B visa application slots are currently unused, and an additional 9,000 slots in the Masters Exemption program are still open. It is not just the economy. Lots of factors are playing their part.

According to Wayne Rash at, the economy is party responsible. India’s talented youth today can enjoy American dream right in their own country. A high tech Bangalore IT job is far more lucrative than coming to US, getting abused by Immigration, law enforcement, face burocracy, racism, lose freedom, family and friends, good food, culture and just “home sweet home!”

These youth of India are vibrant, independent, and free. They come to US for vacation and not for high tech slavery like their previous generation did. India has finally toppled the West in its own game.

The reason why H1B is so unpopular is because America economy is weak and America is no longer a desirable place for immigrants to achieve American dream.

The American dream is in India today. Sooner or later Americans will travel to India and work there to find what their ancestors once used to call American dream and prosperity...

- Link

Yeah, like I give a shit...

Job Cuts And Weeping Workers At IBM India

"Job cuts arrived at multiple IBM locations in India this week and hundreds more layoffs are expected in the coming days.

In Bangalore one IBM unit called STG, the company’s hardware division, turned into a “slaughter house”, a worker reported. “People broke down after seeing the inhuman treatment,” the person wrote in the Alliance@IBM employees’ union website.

The cuts in India are part of IBM’s global plans to lay off thousands. However, employees in India, habituated to years of boom in the technology services industry, appeared to be hard hit. Insiders described emotional scenes following the layoff announcements.

Job cuts are not uncommon in India but Indian companies rarely subject their employees to the clinical ‘cut & exit’ treatment that is usual in the West."

Go talk to Kevin Flanagan's family about "slaughter."

These fucking slumdogs and their shills at Forbes have no shame.




Get ready to have your personal medical data pilfered...


"Reuters reports that CGI Federal, the contractor behind the disaster that is the federal ObamaCare website, is out and another large contractor, Accenture, will take its place with a new $91 million contract. One expert in this area of federal procurement and IT told Reuters that Accenture is no better than CGI, "We'll see how well they do," He said, "but Accenture doesn't have a strong reputation of doing this stuff successfully."

"At the end of the day, you have a company here that turned in subpar and visibly high-profile work. I think that that's a fireable offense," said Clay Johnson, chief executive officer of the Department of Better Technology, and former Presidential Innovation Fellow who has pushed for procurement reforms.

But the government appears poised to replace CGI with another large contractor. The Washington Post, which first broke the news, reported that Accenture will get a year-long contract for the website worth about $90 million. …

Johnson called the news "disappointing" and pointed to examples of poorly managed Accenture contracts highlighted by the Project on Government Oversight, a watchdog group.

For example, the company was publicly faulted by the California Public Employees' Retirement System (Calpers) for costly delays and other problems during a major IT overhaul, Johnson noted.

"We'll see how well they do, but Accenture doesn't have a strong reputation of doing this stuff successfully," Johnson said.

President Obama has tried to blame the website's problems on the federal government procurement system, but that don't stop him from victimizing millions of American by placing  them at the mercy of that procurement system through ObamaCare.

Obama not only cancelled the insurance of millions of Americans, he then forced many of them into a website that didn't work and that still has a number of back end problems. And now it looks as though Obama's solution to the botched website has been to find a new boss who looks just like the old boss.

Unless you want to count the non-renewal of CGI's contract as a firing, President Obama has yet to fire anyone associated with the disastrous roll-out of ObamaCare."


Accenture Delivery Centers in India



Our clients have direct access to our top talent, deep industry knowledge and industrialized breadth of capabilities—to achieve measurable improvements in performance. India is one of the largest geographies for Accenture globally.



  • Bangalore
  • Chennai
  • Delhi
  • Hyderabad
  • Kolkata
  • Mumbai
  • Pune

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Tunnel Rat posted on November 1, 2013 01:11

Readers of my blog knew this was coming, but this story was on the front page of the Wall Street Journal yesterday, on the front page of it's B section today, and also in the New York Times:


October 30, 2013

Federal Inquiry Into Indian Firm Puts a Focus on Widespread Visa Abuses


A federal investigation into visa use by Infosys, the Indian technology outsourcing giant, has brought to light widespread abuses in the industry and prompted investigations into other foreign outsourcing firms, federal officials said Wednesday.

In the largest settlement ever in an immigration case, Infosys admitted no visa violations but agreed Wednesday to pay $34 million to resolve claims made by federal prosecutors in Texas.

The amount of the settlement was relatively small for Infosys, a Bangalore-based global enterprise with 160,000 employees worldwide and reported revenues of $7.9 billion, 70 percent of it from consulting in the United States. But the case added to intensifying legal scrutiny and political skepticism in the United States facing Indian companies that use temporary visas to bring in thousands of guest workers each year for technology and software jobs in American companies.

As part of the settlement, Infosys acknowledged major errors and omissions in records it kept on its employees in the United States, including Indian temporary technology workers brought in for contract work with American companies. But it did not admit to systematic fraud, and the agreement includes a point-by-point rebuttal of prosecutors’ accusations that it tried to increase profits by illegally using short-term business visitors’ visas to bring workers from India, instead of a more expensive and less accessible temporary employment visa, known as H-1B.

“This is not a settlement about systemic visa fraud,” Stephen A. Jonas of WilmerHale, the lead lawyer representing Infosys, said Wednesday after the settlement was made public by prosecutors in Plano, Tex., where Infosys has offices. “The company adamantly denies the visa abuse allegations. They are not true.”

But federal prosecutors and investigators insisted Wednesday that they had uncovered extensive misuse of visas at Infosys. They said they agreed to the settlement because Infosys had cooperated with the investigation and moved speedily to overhaul its record-keeping and improve its visa procedures.

“While Infosys is not admitting any wrongdoing, its leadership did appreciate there were substantial problems in the way they were conducting business in this country,” said John Malcolm Bales, the United States attorney for the Eastern District of Texas, in Plano. “We think they’ve cleaned up their act.”

Each year there is a scramble among technology companies for H-1B employment visas, because there is a basic annual cap of 65,000 visas. In the past three years, Infosys and two other Indian companies — Wipro and Tata Consultancy Services — were among the top five recipients of those visas, according to Ron Hira, a professor at Rochester Institute of Technology who studies the visa system.

The largest user, Cognizant, is an American company that brought in nearly 18,000 foreign workers, almost all from India, Mr. Hira said.

American technology companies have been clamoring for an increase in H-1B visas, saying they face shortages of Americans with advanced skills. A large increase was part of broad immigration legislation that passed the Senate in June, and there is also a measure to raise the limits before the House of Representatives. But the Senate bill also included new protections for Americans that would make it more difficult for foreign outsourcing companies to bring in temporary workers.

It is not clear whether Congress will take further action on those bills this year.

In recent years Congress has sharply raised visa fees for foreign outsourcing companies while immigration authorities imposed new regulations to limit the movement of foreign technology workers in the United States.

“In the past few years there has been a real assault by the federal government on the information technology consulting industry, and it has hit the Indian companies particularly hard,” said Avram Morell, an immigration lawyer in New York.

Infosys has vigorously disputed the government’s accusations. Mr. Jonas, the company’s lawyer, said the government had failed to prove that foreign workers on business visitor visas, known as B-1, were doing any work that was not authorized under their visas. He said no evidence had emerged that any foreign workers ever remained in the United States after their visas had expired.

Since 2011, Infosys put in place new record-keeping and visa procedures and later placed new limitations on the activities in the United States of B-1 visitor visa holders, improvements that were acknowledged in the settlement.

But federal investigators said Wednesday that they had uncovered numerous cases in which Infosys had brought in Indian workers on B-1 visas, to do work not allowed under that visa. Investigators from the State Department and the Department of Homeland Security examined 6,500 B-1 visas Infosys had used to bring in Indian workers over five years.

“The vast majority were illegitimate,” said George M. Nutwell, a special agent in charge of the State Department Diplomatic Security Service in Houston. Investigators went to the American companies where the B-1 workers were placed and discovered they were doing programming and technology engineering work similar to H-1B workers. The business visitor visa is primarily for attending training sessions and meetings, not for work.

“Infosys cheated, plain and simple,” Mr. Nutwell said.

Pamela Kripke contributed reporting.




- Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies

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