Tunnel Rat posted on October 29, 2014 21:18

Electronics For Imaging CEO Guy Gecht makes almost $6 million a year, but still feels the need to import slumdogs and pay them slave wages instead of hiring locals:

Eight workers from India were paid as little as $1.21 an hour by a tech company in Fremont, Calif., over several months in late 2013, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, as reported by the Associated Press.  As a result the company, Electronics for Imaging, which specializes in printing technology, agreed to pay $43,000 in back wages and government penalties. Electronics for Imaging, or EFI, said in a prepared statement that it “unintentionally overlooked” U.S. labor law and has "taken steps to ensure that this type of administrative error does not reoccur."

The workers were transferred from Bangalore, India, to help the company move into a new headquarters building. They logged as many as 122 hours a week (WTF??????) without overtime with some earning as little as $1.21 an hour. California’s minimum wage at the time was $8 an hour.

- LA Times

 

The incident is a reminder that even amid a labor market that has boomed in recent years in Silicon Valley and other parts of the Bay Area, income inequality and payments of relatively low wages can still be a problem for workers in the region. The workers were paid in Indian rupees.

"It's always amazing that some employers think they can go about with this kind of cheating," said Sylvia Allegretto, a UC Berkeley research economist and co-chair of the university's Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics.

An anonymous tip prompted the U.S. Department of Labor to investigate the case, which resulted in more than $40,000 in back wages paid to the eight employees and a fine of $3,500 for Electronics for Imaging.

"There may be good reasons to bring in foreign employees to work at tech companies, but there's no good reason to pay them so little," said Jon Haveman, chief economist with San Rafael-based Marin Consulting.

The eight employees were paid to help install the company's computer network and systems in connection with the move of the company's headquarters from Foster City to Fremont.

Some employees worked up to 122 hours a week. The unlawful employment began Sept. 8, 2013, and concluded Dec. 21, 2013.

"These kinds of egregious wage and law violations go on every day," Allegretto said.

Investigators from the division's San Jose office learned that the technicians were flown in from the employer's office in Bangalore, India.

 "This was discovered through an anonymous tip, and we need that kind of information to discover these sorts of illegal situations," Blanco said.

- Mercury News

 

 

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As much as he has tried, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg has not gotten far with his attempts to flood his company and the rest of American IT shops with slumdogs.  

His fwd.us effort has failed, and even the usually politically correct politicians, like Alabama's Jeff Sessions, have called him out about his need for cheap curry-scented scabs:

Senator Jeff Sessions (R-Alabama) had some harsh words for Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in a speech he delivered on the Senate floor Wednesday evening that was published in the National Review on Thursday.

The speech attributed President Barack Obama's plans for potential executive action that would offer amnesty to some undocumented immigrants to meetings between White House officials and "the world’s most powerful corporate and immigration lobbyists and activists who think border controls are for the little people." Sessions identified Zuckerberg as a leader among pro-immigration business people.

"Mr. Zuckerberg — who has become the top spokesman for expanding the admission of foreign workers — championed the Senate immigration bill for which all of our Democratic colleagues voted," Sessions said. "One of the things the bill did was double the supply of low-wage foreign workers brought into the United States for companies such as Facebook."

Sessions pointed to Zuckerberg's non-profit pro-immigration advocacy group FWD.us as evidence of the Facebook founder's influence on policy. He also noted a Business Insider report from last year describing how Zuckerberg bought four properties surrounding his home for privacy.

"Well, the 'masters of the universe' are very fond of open borders as long as these open borders don’t extend to their gated compounds and fenced-off estates," Sessions quipped. 

Sessions argued tech industry executives had falsely claimed there was a shortage of the educated workers they needed to operate in the U.S. He specifically challenged Zuckerberg, who he noted "just turned 30" and "is worth about $30 billion," to hire more American workers.

"I would pose a question to Mr. Zuckerberg. I read in the news that Facebook is now worth more than $200 billion. Is that not enough money to hire American workers for a change?" Sessions said. "Your company now employs roughly 7,000 people. Let’s say you want to expand your workforce 10 percent, or hire another 700 workers. Are you claiming you can’t find 700 Americans who would take these jobs if you paid a good wage and decent benefits?"

Sessions also suggested Zuckerberg wasn't doing enough to hire American workers laid off by other companies.

"Let me just say one more thing: Facebook has 7,000 workers. Microsoft just laid off 18,000. Why doesn’t Mr. Zuckerberg call his friend Mr. (Bill) Gates and say: Look, I have to hire a few hundred people; do you have any résumés you can send over here?" Sessions said. "Maybe I will not have to take somebody from a foreign country for a job an unemployed U.S. citizen might take."



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/senator-challenges-zuckerberg-hire-american-workers-2014-9#ixzz3DdU1qoYI


Tunnel Rat posted on August 6, 2014 12:20

I am sure that this is just the beginning...

Microsoft employee files discrimination lawsuit

A 53-year-old Maple Valley woman has filed a lawsuit accusing Microsoft of gender, race and age discrimination.

Nancy Williams said in her lawsuit, filed Monday in King County Superior Court, that she was subjected to discrimination and differential treatment, as well as a hostile work environment based on her gender, race (Hispanic) and age.

Williams, who is on medical leave from her job as a software-test manager in Microsoft Azure, has been a full-time Microsoft employee since 1996. She joined the Azure group in 2010.

Williams contends in her suit that the workplace environment at Azure, which was dominated by male engineers, a “substantial percentage of whom were foreign born and of East Indian heritage,” was not supportive of women employees.

Microsoft was aware of that but put up with it because Azure, its cloud-computing platform, was a vital part of its business strategy, the lawsuit alleges.

In a statement, Microsoft said the company “provides an environment where all employees have the opportunity to be successful. We take these claims seriously and will address them with the court.”

According to the lawsuit, Williams in March 2012 began reporting to a new boss, a foreign-born man of East Indian descent, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit.

Williams’ boss no longer works at Microsoft, though his departure was unrelated to this matter, according to sources close to the situation. He could not immediately be reached for comment.

The lawsuit alleges Williams’ boss ignored her during meetings, excluded her from important internal communications related to Azure, was dismissive of her suggestions and blamed her for situations that were not her responsibility, while treating his male subordinates favorably.

She also questioned her boss, and her boss’ supervisor — also of East Indian descent — over their awarding of a contract to an Indian company over other companies, the suit says.

In a meeting behind closed doors in her boss’s office in January 2013, her boss “approached Williams, who was seated, and stood over her in very close proximity,” requiring Williams to repeat several times: “You are my manager, I will do as you say,” the lawsuit contends.

Williams claims she reported this and other incidents to Microsoft’s human-resources department but was cautioned against filing a formal complaint. After she did anyway, the investigation into her case lagged while she was on a two-month sabbatical, the suit says.

She also spoke of her boss’s behavior to his supervisors — also of East Indian descent — but either nothing was done or she was told her complaints would lead to negative discussions about her performance, according to the suit.

Upon her return from sabbatical, the suit alleges, Williams’ boss gave her a very low rating in her performance review and waved his fists in her face.

Williams claims she suffered panic attacks and her health began to erode.

She is seeking double the amount of her lost salary and bonus and stock awards incurred to date and which will accrue in the future, unspecified additional damages, and costs and attorney’s fees.

Williams is also asking the court to order an independent audit of the human-resources department’s practices and require that every Azure employee get training on discrimination, hostile work environments and retaliation.

seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2024241588_microsoftsuitxml.html


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It looks like the shills for the ethic cleansing of American techies are getting called out for their propaganda:

Silicon Valley has created an imaginary staffing shortage.

Business executives and politicians endlessly complain that there is a "shortage" of qualified Americans and that the U.S. must admit more high-skilled guest workers to fill jobs in STEM fields: science, technology, engineering and math. This claim is echoed by everyone from President Obama and Rupert Murdoch to Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates.

Yet within the past month, two odd things occurred: Census reported that only one in four STEM degree holders is in a STEM job, and Microsoft announced plans to downsize its workforce by 18,000 jobs. Even so, the House is considering legislationthat, like the Senate immigration bill before it, would increase to unprecedented levels the supply of high-skill guest workers and automatic green cards to foreign STEM students.

As longtime researchers of the STEM workforce and immigration who have separately done in-depth analyses on these issues, and having no self-interest in the outcomes of the legislative debate, we feel compelled to report that none of us has been able to find any credible evidence to support the IT industry's assertions of labor shortages.

Stagnant wages

If a shortage did exist, wages would be rising as companies tried to attract scarce workers. Instead, legislation that expanded visas for IT personnel during the 1990s has kept average wages flat over the past 16 years. Indeed, guest workers have become the predominant source of new hires in these fields.

Those supporting even greater expansion seem to have forgotten about the hundreds of thousands of American high-tech workers who are being shortchanged — by wages stuck at 1998 levels, by diminished career prospects and by repeated rounds of layoffs.

The facts are that, excluding advocacy studies by those with industry funding, there is a remarkable concurrence among a wide range of researchers that there is an ample supply of American workers (native and immigrant, citizen and permanent resident) who are willing and qualified to fill the high-skill jobs in this country. The only real disagreement is whether supply is two or three times larger than the demand.

Unfortunately, companies are exploiting the large existing flow of guest workers to deny American workers access to STEM careers and the middle-class security that should come with them. Imagine, then, how many more Americans would be frozen out of the middle class if politicians and tech moguls succeeded in doubling or tripling the flow of guest workers into STEM occupations.

More...

 


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As soon as insurgents saw the elevation of Microsoft's Satya Nadella to CEO, they knew that the ethnic cleansing of non-Indians would begin.  At least U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions had the balls to call bullshit on Mr. Softie's need for H-1Bs as it purges a bunch of crackers from its ranks:

 

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) criticized Microsoft founder Bill Gates for calling on Congress to increase STEM worker visas while the company plans to cut 18,000 jobs next year.

“Super billionaires aren’t happy apparently. … They declare we need to import more foreign workers,” Sessions said on the Senate floor Thursday. “Mr. Gates says we need to let more and more people into our country to take those kinds of jobs.”

 

Sessions was referring to an op-ed in which Gates called on the House to pass the bipartisan Senate immigration reform bill. That legislation would increase the number of worker visas for immigrants in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.

Sessions pointed out that Microsoft announced Thursday that it plans to layoff nearly 20,000 workers in an effort to streamline. He said those workers should take priority over immigrants.

Sessions also cited a recent U.S. census reports that stated 75 percent of U.S. citizens with STEM degrees aren’t working in that field.

“We need them working first before we bring more people in,” Sessions said. “I don’t think you can make the argument that we have a labor shortage.”

Sessions has been an ardent critic of the Senate-passed immigration reform bill, which also would provide a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants within the United States and increase spending for border security.


Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/senate/212599-sessions-teases-gates-call-for-immigrant-workers-yet-lays-off-18k#ixzz381qO8ms9 


Tunnel Rat posted on July 11, 2014 13:13

I hate to just re-post all the time, but Patrick Thibidodeau at Computerworld has been doing some amazing work lately uncovering the invasion of Curry Scented Wage Pirates.  He used be one of the doom-and-gloomers who wrote that American IT pros were fucked, but now he is a worthy Insurgent.

Court case offers a peek at how H-1B-fueled discrimination works

One-third of Infosys worksites have 100% Asian workers, lawsuit alleges

Patrick Thibodeau
 
 

July 10, 2014 (Computerworld)

The passage of the Affordable Care Act brought with it a burst of IT spending and hiring. The District of Columbia, for instance, hired offshore outsourcing firm Infosys for $49.5 million to build its Healthcare Exchange.

The India-based Infosys brought in H-1B visa holders to work on the government project. And of the approximately 100 Infosys employees working on the healthcare project, only three were American, according to a civil lawsuit filed in federal court.

The IT professional making the claim, Layla Bolten, has a degree in computer science and has been in IT since 1996. An experienced tester, which is what she was hired for, Bolten often helped less-experienced staff.

But the lawsuit contends Bolten was harassed because she was not Indian and excluded from work conversations by supervisors who spoke Hindi. People with less experience were promoted over her, and she eventually quit.

Bolten is one of four IT workers from around the country suing Infosys for "ongoing national origin and race discrimination." The lawsuit claims that "roughly 90%" of Infosys workforce is South Asian, the result of "intentional employment discrimination."

Infosys has filed a motion for dismissal on a number of technical and legal claims. The case awaits a ruling on that motion from a judge in the Eastern District of Wisconsin, where the suit was filed late last year.

Infosys officials were asked for comment beyond the dismissal request but did not immediately respond.

Whether this lawsuit is eventually dismissed, settled out of court, or goes to trial, is another matter. But the case offers insight into a contentious issue that is central to the ongoing H-1B debate.

Discrimination by race, age and sex is the leading criticism leveled at the H-1B visa program. The plaintiffs in this particular case are only making a claim of discrimination by national origin, and their case presents new facts to support itself.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission collects workplace data from employers with more than 100 employees. This data is kept confidential, unless it comes out in a court case or is voluntarily disclosed.

While few companies disclose this information, some tech companies are starting to do so. In May, Google released its workplace data, which is otherwise known as the Employer Information Report or EEO-1. It showed that 30% of its employees are women, 61% are white, 30% are Asian, 4% are of two or more races, 3% are Hispanic, and 2% are black.

When it released the data, Google said in a statement: "We're not where we want to be when it comes to diversity. And it is hard to address these kinds of challenges if you're not prepared to discuss them openly, and with the facts."

Infosys does not voluntarily disclose its diversity data for its U.S. workforce.

But the plaintiffs in the lawsuit were able to this get federal demographic data. Infosys was required to report the demographic make-up of any location at which it employs at least 50 people, according to the lawsuit. In 2012, there were 59 such Infosys sites across the U.S. that met that threshold. The lawsuit said that for more one third of the sites - 21 -- Infosys reported that 100% of the employees are Asian. For 53 of the 59 sites, at least 94.5% of the employees were Asian. The lowest percentage of Asian employees at any site was 73.8%.

Infosys is among the top three users of the H-1B visa, and H-1B workers are predominately from India. Approximately 58% of all the H-1B petitions approved in 2011 were from workers born in India; in 2012, that figure was 64%, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) data.

Offshore firms mostly hire H-1B workers from India, according to data obtained by Ron Hira, an assistant professor of public policy at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. His data shows that 97% of the H-1B visa workers hired by Infosys were from India. Other large offshore firms had similarly high percentages.

While age discrimination is not part of this lawsuit, the USCIS data helps to illustrate why critics believe H-1B workers are used to replace older workers. Of all the H-1B petitions approved in 2012, 72% were for workers between the ages of 25 and 34; in 2011, that figure was even higher, 74%.

There is no available government data on the sex of H-1B workers, but the IEEE-USA estimates that at least 80% of H-1B workers are males.

It is a fair question to ask, as the lawsuit contends, why Infosys only had three American workers working on the District of Columbia's healthcare exchange. The Washington D.C. area does not lack people with tech skills. Of the largest metropolitan areas in the U.S., Washington has the most people with advanced degrees, (22.9%) and bachelor degrees (48%).

The District's government has made hiring locally a priority. Several District officials were contacted for comment about whether the apparent use of a large number of foreign workers on a government contract is in line with hiring goals, but none responded.

 covers cloud computing and enterprise applications, outsourcing, government IT policies, data centers and IT workforce issues for Computerworld. Follow Patrick on Twitter at Twitter @DCgov or subscribe to Patrick's RSS feed Thibodeau RSS. His e-mail address ispthibodeau@computerworld.com.

See more by Patrick Thibodeau on Computerworld.com.

 

READ THE COMPLAINT HERE : 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/175546283/Amended-Complaint-Infosys

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Once this was linked on The Drudge Report, comments started flooding in.   has never had a post get more than a few hundred comments.  Now, he is seeing 3k+:

This IT worker had to train an H-1B replacement

U.S. workers protested job losses to foreign workers by displaying American flags in their cubicles

Patrick Thibodeau
 
 

June 10, 2014 (Computerworld)

This is the story of an IT worker who was replaced by a worker on an H-1B visa, one of a number of visa holders, mostly from India, who took jobs at this U.S. company. Computerworld is not going to use the worker's name or identify the companies involved to protect the former employee from retaliation. For purposes of this story, the worker has been given initials -- A.B. (They're not the person's real initials.)

At A.B.'s company, about 220 IT jobs have been lost to offshore outsourcing over the last year. A.B. is telling the story because, initially, there was little knowledge among fellow employees about H-1B visa holders and how they are used. They didn't know that offshore outsourcing firms are the largest users of H-1B visas, or exactly how this visa facilitates IT job losses in the U.S.

"I think once we learned about it, we became angrier toward the U.S. government than we were with the people that were over here from India," A.B. said, "because the government is allowing this."

The IT workers at this firm first learned of the offshore outsourcing threat through rumors. Later, the IT staff was called into an auditorium and heard directly from the CIO about the plan to replace them. It would take months for the transition to be completed, in part because of some new system installations....

-- More...

 

 covers cloud computing and enterprise applications, outsourcing, government IT policies, data centers and IT workforce issues for Computerworld. Follow Patrick on Twitter at Twitter @DCgov or subscribe to Patrick's RSS feed Thibodeau RSS. His e-mail address ispthibodeau@computerworld.com.

See more by Patrick Thibodeau on Computerworld.com.


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There is more retribution to come...

 

Cantor, a reliable 'yes' vote for raising the H-1B visa cap, is unseated

GOP House Majority Leader Eric Cantor supported the H-1B visa; his challenger did not

Patrick Thibodeau
 
 

June 11, 2014 (Computerworld)

WASHINGTON -- Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.), the House majority leader who lost a primary bid Tuesday for re-election, was a reliable "yes" vote for increasing the H-1B visa cap.

Cantor lost to challenger David Brat, a professor at Randolph-Macon College with a Ph.D. in economics -- and an opponent of the H-1B visa.

Brat's victory doesn't signal a reversal in bipartisan support in Congress for increasing the number of H-1B visas. Cantor saw the visa program as an area for bipartisan agreement, and he was on solid ground in saying so.

The Senate's bipartisan immigration bill, approved last year, would more than double the H-1B cap, increasing it from 85,000 to 180,000 annually. The fight over immigration has focused more on providing a path to citizenship for the approximate 12 million illegal immigrants in the U.S., not on raising the H-1B visa cap.

Few candidates in either party draw attention to the H-1B visa in their races. But Brat used the H-1B against Cantor.

In one statement, Brat wrote: "The Chamber wants low-skilled cheap labor; Mark Zuckerberg wants high-skilled cheap labor, but, at the end of the day, what they have in common is that they all want cheap labor and Eric Cantor wants to give it to them."

It's hard to know whether Brat's use of the H-1B visa, by itself, made much a difference in this contest or whether it will encourage others to attack the visa program.

Facebook's Zuckerberg is an active supporter for increasing the H-1B cap, and helped to create a lobbying group, FWD.us. In the wake of Cantor's defeat, the group put the best spin it could on Cantor loss by pointing, in a Twitter message, to a Public Policy poll (download PDF) that assessed voter support on various issues in Cantor's district. On the subject of immigration, when asked about providing eligibility for a path to citizenship, 40% of the respondents strongly support, and 32% somewhat supported.

Cantor, and other Republican leaders, reached out to the tech industry, and believed that a free market ethos and message was in synch with Silicon Valley's start-up culture. In a 2011 speech at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, Cantor talked about creating a better environment for start-ups with tax and regulatory reform.

That same year, Cantor and his fellow so-called "young guns," U.S., Rep. Paul Ryan, the Budget Committee chair, and Kevin McCarthy, the House majority whip, appeared with Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's chief operating officer, at a town hall meeting that was streamed live.

Tech-related contributions to Cantor in the 2014 election cycle totaled $82,000, far below securities and investment industry contributors, who sent in $677,000 and real estate contributions that totaled $268,000.

Cantor's largest tech contributor was Oracle, which sent $25,000.

The fate of the H-1B visa cap has been tied to the broader issue of immigration reform, where there are much larger divisions. This has thwarted efforts by lawmakers to treat the H-1B visa as a separate issue and to raise the cap independent of comprehensive immigration reform.

Without a doubt, the tech industry lost one vote for an H-1B cap increase with Cantor's defeat, and Brat's win may kill any chance of immigration reform in this Congress. But Brat's attack on the H-1B program doesn't necessarily mean that other Republicans, who have backed a cap increase, will reconsider their support for the temporary work visa, and abandon the tech industry on what may be its top issue.

 covers cloud computing and enterprise applications, outsourcing, government IT policies, data centers and IT workforce issues for Computerworld. Follow Patrick on Twitter at Twitter @DCgov or subscribe to Patrick's RSS feed Thibodeau RSS. His e-mail address ispthibodeau@computerworld.com.

See more by Patrick Thibodeau on Computerworld.com.


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It is about time...

 

Tech worker groups boycott IBM, Infosys, Manpower

Advocacy groups say the companies should look first for U.S. tech workers for U.S. IT jobs

Grant Gross
 
 

June 2, 2014 (IDG News Service)

Three U.S. tech worker groups have launched a labor boycott of IBM, Infosys and Manpower, saying the companies have engaged in a pattern that discourages U.S. workers from applying for U.S. IT jobs by tailoring employment ads toward overseas workers.

The companies should look first for U.S. workers to fill U.S. IT jobs, said representatives of Bright Future Jobs, the Programmers Guild and WashTech.

With the boycott, the three groups want to raise awareness of discriminatory hiring practices and put pressure on the three companies to consider U.S. IT workers for U.S. jobs, said Donna Conroy, director of Bright Future Jobs.

The main goals of the boycott are "attention getting" and putting pressure on the IT staffing firms to change their practices, Conroy said. With IT staffing agencies competing to fill U.S. positions, the companies contracting for their services may want to consider if the staffing firm "has a good reputation," she said.

The boycott should also raise concerns about staffing firms violating equal employment laws, said Les French, president of WashTech. "In addition to calling attention to an illegal practice, we want to show there are valid challenges to the 'labor shortage' of STEM workers," French said in an email.

An Infosys spokeswoman disputed the charges that it avoids recruiting U.S. IT workers.

"It is incorrect to allude that we exclude or discourage U.S. workers," she said by email. "Today, we are recruiting for over 440 active openings across 20 states in the U.S."

Many of the positions target people who have a U.S. master's degree in business administration for sales and management consultant jobs, she said. "The graduate hiring program is a key investment to strengthen our future leadership pool," she added. "Attracting the best and brightest talent is paramount to Infosys success."

The company's external job posts give "everyone an equal opportunity to apply," she added. The company supports several minority advocacy groups, she said.

Representatives from IBM and Manpower didn't respond to requests for comment on the boycott.

In some cases, a Manpower subsidiary has advertised for Indian IT workers to come to the U.S. for openings anticipated more than a year in advance, said Conroy, author of a white paper, released last week, that is focused on Manpower's IT recruitment efforts in India.

The advertisements in India are being placed even though "most Americans believe the nature of the tech industry is so fast-paced that staffing projections cannot be adequately foreseen," she said.

Meanwhile, Manpower is not advertising for U.S. IT positions on U.S. job portals, Conroy said. But if Manpower advertised in the U.S. using the same lead time it is using in India, it would give companies "plenty of time to seek Americans first."

In November 2013, Manpower subsidiary Experis IT India advertised in India for an OpenStack engineer for a U.S. position, Bright Future Jobs noted. "We are now hiring young, dynamic, skilled and experienced IT professionals from India to work with us in the U.S.," the ad said.

Other Experis IT India ads in late 2013 talked about the company filling out H-1B worker visa applications for job applicants, with one ad saying "all expenses related to your visa filing would be take care of" by Manpower.

The three tech workers groups also plan to launch an educational effort aimed at helping U.S. tech workers recognize discriminatory job ads and questions during job interviews, Conroy said. "When people are educated, there will likely be more lawsuits" related to discriminatory employment practices, she said.

Rajiv Dabhadkar, the founder of the National Organization for Software and Technology Professionals, a national tech advocacy organization in India, said he supports the boycott.

Indian employers show a "strong preference" for Indian IT workers, Dabhadkar said. He questioned why U.S. companies don't do the same thing.

The boycott "will protect the Indian foreign workers from the accusation of displacing Americans," he said. "Indians were not put on this earth to displace Americans, but Manpower's recruiting efforts show this is their plan."

Segregated recruiting opens the door to "unscrupulous agents" who make false promises to Indian IT workers, he added.

"The brokerage of intellectual capital drives down wages, and foreign workers are under paid," Dabhadkar said by email. "Multiple layers of broker agencies, that earn a per hour commission of their visa-sponsored employee creates a grey market."

Importing foreign workers to the U.S. as a commodity violates human rights, he added. "American employers gain competitive advantage and profitability by labor arbitrage, by paying low to their sponsored workers, and bidding high to their clients," Dabhadkar said.

Grant Gross covers technology and telecom policy in the U.S. government for The IDG News Service. Follow Grant on Twitter at GrantGross. Grant's email address is grant_gross@idg.com.



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