Tunnel Rat posted on August 9, 2015 03:25

From the LA Times:

 

...Yet many studies suggest that the STEM shortage is a myth. In computer science and engineering, says Hal Salzman, an expert on technology education at Rutgers, "the supply of graduates is substantially larger than the demand for them in industry." Qualcomm is not the only high-tech company to be aggressively downsizing. The computer industry, led by Hewlett-Packard and Microsoft, cut nearly 60,000 jobs last year,according to the outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The electronics industry pared an additional 20,000 positions.

...Nevertheless, high-tech employers such as Qualcomm, Google, Microsoft and Facebook lobby hard for more latitude in employing workers on H-1B visas. These are designed to serve high-skilled immigrants but often enable the importing of Indian and Chinese guest workers to replace an older, more experienced, but more expensive domestic workforce. Visa issuance is capped at 85,000 per year, including foreign holders of U.S. advanced degrees, but a bill sponsored by Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) would raise the limit to as many as 195,000...

 


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Tunnel Rat posted on June 14, 2015 02:17

It looks like one slumdog invasion at Disney has been put on hold after threats of a boycott...

Just two weeks ago, the Disney ABC Television Group told a team of approximately 30 to 35 application developers that they were being laid off. Their jobs were being moved to an IT contractor with large offshore operations. Some were told their last day would be at the end of July.

But on Thursday, the Disney ABC TV Media Technology & Strategy development team told the developers that their layoffs were being rescinded. The change was confirmed by a Disney ABC source, although a company spokesman would not comment on the reversal or even confirm it.

 

- Computerworld

 

The feds are also investigating slumdog bodyshops Infosys and Tata over charges of ethnic cleansing at Southern California Edison:

 

The U.S. government is investigating two Indian outsourcing firms and a California power company over whether they violated labor and immigration laws by replacing American workers with foreigners on temporary work visas.

The Labor Department said it is trying to ensure the Indian companies and Southern California Edison complied with the terms of the nation’s skilled-worker-visa system. Controversy has exploded in recent months over whether these foreign workers, who typically have visas known as H-1Bs, displace or complement U.S. workers.

A Labor Department spokeswoman said she couldn’t provide any more details of an “open investigation.”

 This comes on the heals of another slumdog invasion at Fossil:

 

Yet another American business, this time Fossil Group, has fired most of its tech workers to make way for cheaper foreign replacements.

“We’re doing what we think is the right thing for Fossil,” CIO Ed Robben told The Dallas Morning News, saying the move will help the company cut costs and invest in other areas.

To keep their severance packages, the fired employees will have to train their foreign replacements in videotaped “knowledge transfer sessions,” which the Indian firm charged with replacing them, Infosys, will use to train its workers in other countries.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


This is just the beginning...

 

(Reuters) - Tata Consultancy Services Ltd has been sued by a white American information technology worker who accused India's largest software services exporter of overwhelming favoritism toward workers of South Asian descent in the United States.

In a complaint filed on Tuesday in San Francisco federal court, Steven Heldt said 95 percent of Tata's 14,000-person U.S. workforce descend from South Asia, primarily India, and that the company violated federal civil rights law by intentionally favoring them in hiring, promotion and termination decisions.

Ben Trounson, a Tata spokesman, in an email said the Mumbai-based company "is confident that Mr. Heldt's allegations are baseless, and plans to vigorously defend itself."

Tata's market value is just over 5 trillion rupees (US$80 billion), Reuters data show. It separately reported fiscal fourth-quarter results on Thursday.

Heldt said he experienced "substantial anti-American sentiment" in his 20 months at Tata, including from a human resources manager who allegedly called Americans "selfish and demanding" and said "I don't like dealing with Americans."

Despite claiming to have been in the industry since 1996, Heldt said Tata saddled him with "menial" or no substantive work as it shuffled him between several jobs, ending with the Californian's firing in March 2014.

Heldt is seeking class-action status for Tata workers and job applicants in the United States since April 2011 who are not of South Asian race or from India, Bangladesh and Nepal. He seeks a halt to discrimination, and unspecified damages.

"The experience of Mr. Heldt is representative of what is happening across the country at Tata," his lawyer Daniel Kotchen said in a phone interview. "We believe it reflects a broad preference toward a specific race and national origin, and that any such preference violates U.S. anti-discrimination laws."

Trounson, the Tata spokesman, said the company bases employment decisions on "legitimate non-discriminatory business reasons," without regard to race or national origin.

The case is Heldt v Tata Consultancy Services Ltd, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 15-01696.


A bipartisan group of senators is seeking a federal investigation into alleged abuses in a popular visa program that has been linked to layoffs of U.S. workers in favor of cheaper foreign labor, the Los Angeles Times has learned.

Prompted by reports of massive layoffs at Southern California Edison Co. as the utility company outsources information technology jobs and other positions, the senators Thursday called on the Justice, Homeland Security and Labor departments to investigate the practice.

- LA TIMES

 

...In the letter, the senators wrote: "To add insult to injury, many of the replaced American employees report that they have been forced to train the foreign workers who are taking their jobs. This troubling practice seems to be particularly concentrated in the information technology (IT) sector, which is not surprising given that 65% percent of H-1B petitions approved in FY 2014 were for workers in computer-related occupations. Though such reports of H-1B-driven layoffs have been circulating for years, their frequency seems to have increased dramatically in the past year alone."

- COMPUTERWORLD

 

...The company told employees a year in advance that their positions might be eliminated as part of a move to outsource the information technology department to Infosys and Tata Consultancy Services, both based in India.

In a statement to Fusion, Southern California Edison, or SCE, said the move was part of “an effort to act as cost effectively and prudently as possible in operations for its customers,” citing the need to match services provided by competitors. 

- FUSION


This SCE story seems to gaining traction. Here, SoCal talk-radio hosts Jon and Ken had a rep from IEEE to talk about the purge of American techies at Southern California Edison:

Perhaps the collaborators want another workplace massacre...

 

Click to view this disturbing story:

 

A fellow insurgent at SCE informed me about this confidential report that indicates that SCE was a SHITHOLE:

final-imt-report.pdf (601.63 kb)


I was taking a little hiatus from blogging and didn't realize that my hosting company expected me to pay for their service...

I'll try to file more dispatches from the IT front, but in all honesty, we are sort of in a state of trench warfare in the battle against the curry-scented wage pirates.  My own recent experiences as an IT contractor indicate that slumdog H-1Bs are fewer and farther between in corporate IT as the economy has picked up pace.  Wages for guys like me are rising, and although they are not at dot-com era levels, they are up.

Clearly the IT companies that used to purge American techies to make way for bugger-farming chair-warmers from the land that time forgot have learned a lesson -- DON'T CONFUSE PRICE WITH VALUE.  With the H-1B cap still in place and some high-profile lawsuits, companies are now forced to deal with the market forces of supply and demand.  Now that I am on the market again, having escaped another Desi manager and his H-1B-turned GC-carrying tech lead at a place that shall remain nameless, I can attest to the relative shift in the demographics of the IT landscape.  Of course, I still get the numerous calls from marble-mouthed retards like "Amit from Macrosoft" wanting to see if I am interested in a COBOL position in Des Moines, but even the calls from the Desi bodyshops seem to be less frequent, now coming in at 3 or 4 a day instead of 10 or 12.  Case in point, Molina Healthcare, a notorious curry den here in SoCal that got caught purging whitey to make way for a pack of jackals from Cognizant, is now actively recruiting programmers to clean up the mess that the slumdogs left.  A recruiter even referred to "that H-1B thing" at Molina in a recent phone call I had.  

I always found it amazing that the biggest advocates for having unlimited H-1Bs pour into our country are usually the free-market plutocrats that opine at places like the Wall Street Journal.  Speaking about the WSJ, I've heard from a few insurgents that there is reporter sniffing around and wanting to talk to the infamous Tunnel Rat.  FYI, Tunnel Rat doesn't speak to journalists that work for an organ of the hi-tech regime that would like to see him making Mumbai-level rates coding complex software.  There are almost 10 years of posts here to read, including a screenplay, so what more can I add for his below-the-fold Section B story?  I bet he is expecting to hear some sob story about a middle-aged hack who didn't see the writing on the wall when his whole IT department started smelling like tandori chicken and everybody began communicating in broken English, and then found himself a victim of occupational apartheid, jobless and bitter, left to vent on his blog.  That is what they always want, because that is all you read about when you see a story about the H-1Bs.  The theme follows a pattern - poor, brilliant Kumar who can't get a green card or naive Ashish living in a guest house with 10 other slumdogs in Edison, or the 40-something techie out on his ass, going on his second year of non-work, bitching about how some douchebag named Amir flooded his old company with slumdogs.  

You will never hear about the ex-Marine who got his Desi boss shit-canned for trying to game the recruiting process at a big-ass tech company so that he could flood his department with fellow upper-caste Indians, preferably from Gujarit.  Yeah, that guy -- the one who can tell recruiters to literally fuck off when they send him a req. with a below-market rate and an invitation to meet with the hiring manager named Rajeet.  No, that narrative doesn't play well with the subscribers to the WSJ, who bitch and moan about having to pay circa-1999 wages to developers with cutting edge skills and twenty years experience in IT -- THOSE FUCKERS WANT A 25-YEAR OLD SLUMDOG WITH THE SAME CV, AT HALF THE PRICE.  

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


There Is No Tech Worker Shortage And If There Is It's The Tech Companies' Fault

You may have noticed that the big tech companies are agitating for an expansion of the H1B visa system whereby foreigners with certain tech skills can come and work in the US. You know, for big tech companies and the like. Easy issuance of green cards for those with those tech skills. It’s not an unusual set of requests: the tech companies would dearly love to be able to find all the talent they think they require and obviously, just like any other business, they’d prefer to pay less rather than more for their supplies of whatever it is.

However, we ought to look rather askance at such requests. As Noah Smith points out in a nice piece for Bloomberg.

In economics, I learned that a shortage is when demand exceeds supply. People want to buy Goldfish crackers at the posted price, but the shelves go empty. I was also taught that the only way that this happens is when something stops the price from adjusting — a price-control law, perhaps, or the difficulty of printing out new prices for the shelves. Normally, I was told, the store would just raise the price until the last package of Goldfish is so expensive that no one can afford it, and there would then be no shortage.

But it looks as if I was taught the wrong definition of shortage, because everyone else in the world seems to use the word in a very different way. When normal people say, “There is a shortage,” they don’t mean, “The shelf is empty.” They mean “Please lower the price, so I don’t have to pay as much.” And when normal people say, “No, there’s no shortage,” what they mean is, “Please increase the price I get for my wares because I’d like to make more money.”

Quite so. What those big tech companies are saying isn’t that there’s a shortage of decent engineers in the US. They’re saying there’s a shortage of good engineers at the price they want to pay. The correct answer to which is that they should raise the price they’re willing to pay for good engineers. Sure, this does raise the already very high wages of Silicon Valley engineers. But as Smith points out, it starts to raise all US wages. for higher wages for engineers will lead to more training to be such engineers, leaving open the places they would have taken otherwise (say, as quants on Wall Street) and everyone in the country gets to move up a step. OK, sure, the effect of 100,000 more engineers in a society of 300 million people isn’t going to be directly measurable but it will be there.

So, Smith is entirely correct: but I would take this a stage further myself. For recall thatApple, Adobe, Google and the rest (Facebook being the odd one out, the one that refused to join in) got caught conspiring to artificially limit the wages of engineers? By having non-compete clauses in the Valley? If they hadn’t done this engineers’ salaries would be higher, this would have provided the incentive for more to train as engineers and, around and about now actually, those newly trained engineers would be hitting the job market and alleviating that “shortage” that the tech companies are complaining about.

MORE...


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Tunnel Rat posted on October 29, 2014 21:18

Electronics For Imaging CEO Guy Gecht makes almost $6 million a year, but still feels the need to import slumdogs and pay them slave wages instead of hiring locals:

Eight workers from India were paid as little as $1.21 an hour by a tech company in Fremont, Calif., over several months in late 2013, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, as reported by the Associated Press.  As a result the company, Electronics for Imaging, which specializes in printing technology, agreed to pay $43,000 in back wages and government penalties. Electronics for Imaging, or EFI, said in a prepared statement that it “unintentionally overlooked” U.S. labor law and has "taken steps to ensure that this type of administrative error does not reoccur."

The workers were transferred from Bangalore, India, to help the company move into a new headquarters building. They logged as many as 122 hours a week (WTF??????) without overtime with some earning as little as $1.21 an hour. California’s minimum wage at the time was $8 an hour.

- LA Times

 

The incident is a reminder that even amid a labor market that has boomed in recent years in Silicon Valley and other parts of the Bay Area, income inequality and payments of relatively low wages can still be a problem for workers in the region. The workers were paid in Indian rupees.

"It's always amazing that some employers think they can go about with this kind of cheating," said Sylvia Allegretto, a UC Berkeley research economist and co-chair of the university's Center on Wage and Employment Dynamics.

An anonymous tip prompted the U.S. Department of Labor to investigate the case, which resulted in more than $40,000 in back wages paid to the eight employees and a fine of $3,500 for Electronics for Imaging.

"There may be good reasons to bring in foreign employees to work at tech companies, but there's no good reason to pay them so little," said Jon Haveman, chief economist with San Rafael-based Marin Consulting.

The eight employees were paid to help install the company's computer network and systems in connection with the move of the company's headquarters from Foster City to Fremont.

Some employees worked up to 122 hours a week. The unlawful employment began Sept. 8, 2013, and concluded Dec. 21, 2013.

"These kinds of egregious wage and law violations go on every day," Allegretto said.

Investigators from the division's San Jose office learned that the technicians were flown in from the employer's office in Bangalore, India.

 "This was discovered through an anonymous tip, and we need that kind of information to discover these sorts of illegal situations," Blanco said.

- Mercury News

 

 

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- Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies

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The thoughts expressed on this blog may or may not be the author's own and are protected by the 1st Amendment. Any attempt to reveal his identity by contacting a slumdog hack at Google, or a corrupt Desi sys-admin at his ISP will be dealt with promptly and severely. Civil and criminal penalties may apply if one is found to have used private information in an attempt to get the author fired at the Hindu-only I.T. ghetto he currently works at. In addition, any Desi who attempts to burn the author's house down because they are enraged over his writing will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. This isn't India.

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