Stephen Fleming, a collaborator douchebag now hiding at Georgia Tech (WTF is a "Enterprise Innovation Institute" anyway?) had to chime in and support high-tech slave trader Mayor Bloomberg on his obscure blog.  For that, he got a resounding ass-whooping by Insurgents, and resorted to pansy-ass liberal academic whining involving the "Holocaust", and subtly dropping the "I know who your and I have your IP" card. 

Here is the post in its entirety, with its obession with all things brown and curry-scented:

 

Back in June, I blogged about immigration as it affects student entrepreneurs at Georgia Tech. Apparently that qualified me as an expert on immigration policy! Someone at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce noticed what I’d written and invited me to a forum in Washington yesterday on “Immigration and American Competitiveness.”

It gave me a chance to meet Michael Bloomberg, and I strongly recommend that you take the time to listen to his keynote, which is archived on C-SPAN here. He made my points far better than I could have!

But I also enjoyed the panel discussion which followed. If you’re inclined, you can watch the whole thing here. My bit starts at 43:20, and I chime in again around 1:27:10. Since I had my notes on my iPad, I was able to update them in realtime at the event; that text is below.

(FYI, using Pages on the iPad with 40-point Helvetica makes a great personal teleprompter!)

Thanks for inviting me here. I appreciate the opportunity.

I could probably replace my prepared remarks with “What Mike said.” His Honor did a great job.

Although I’m not an academic, I think my role today is to discuss immigration from the point of view of a major research university. And I’d like to follow that with some of the issues with current immigration policies that affect what our students can do AFTER graduation.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with Georgia Tech, we’re the largest engineering school in the United States. But we’re not just big; some folks think we’re pretty good.

U.S. News ranks us as the 4th best engineering school in the U.S. — when the top three are MIT, Stanford, and Cal Berkeley, #4 isn’t a bad place to be.

They rank us as the 7th best public university of all types.

And we’re not just good at one thing. They rank twelve types of engineering degrees — electrical, mechanical, civil, etc. We rank in the Top Ten for eleven of them, and we don’t offer the twelfth.

We’re in Atlanta. As you might expect, since the civil rights era, we have a strong history of graduating minorities. Whether you’re measuring Bachelor’s, Master’s, or Ph.D.’s, we’re Top Ten for African-Americans, for Asian-Americans, and for Hispanics, and for minorities overall.

And we have a lot of foreign students.

Right now, about 7% of our undergraduates and 40% of our graduate students are on foreign visas.

Forty percent. As Tom pointed out, the national average for STEM graduate students is actually over 50%. And as Robin pointed out it’s north of 60% in computer science.

At Georgia Tech, the bulk of our foreign students come from, unsurprisingly, India, China, and Korea. But, overall, they come from 115 countries. –I don’t think I could name 115 countries!– Overall, between graduate and undergraduate, that’s 18% of our total enrollment, or about 3800 out of 21,000 students.

It’s hard to get into Georgia Tech. We get six applications for every slot in our freshman class, so you know that we’re pretty picky about who we let in. The 3800 foreign students on our campus are the best of the best. Smart, hard-working, flexible… you couldn’t ask for better students. Or better employees. Or better CITIZENS.

But the United States has put up barriers to letting these students build their careers in America. Just getting their student visas approved — not even talking yet about permanent residency! — is a bureaucratic nightmare. It discourages many of them to just give up, and study in other countries.

It didn’t used to be that way. A hundred years ago, the United States had, at best, a second-tier set of colleges and universities. Harvard was pretty good, but things fell off pretty rapidly from there. But, by 1950, we had unquestionably the finest higher education system in the world. We still have it today, although the rest of the world is trying hard to catch up.

What happened? IMMIGRATION. Our university system in this country was BUILT on immigration.

Specifically, Hitler came to power in 1933 and destroyed the German university system, which at that time was the finest in the world. Many of those professors, and even students, escaped to Britain and the United States. That won the war. Imagine the Manhattan Project without Jewish scientists. Imagine if they’d stayed in Germany.

After World War II, Europe was wrecked, and even MORE came to the United States from all over the Continent.

And then from Latin America, and from Asia… We imported the best brains from all over the world into our colleges and universities. And that led to a half-century of unchallenged economic dominance.

A couple of months ago, I was at a Georgia Tech student event, the Convergence Innovation Competition. I was INCREDIBLY impressed by the quality of the student entrepreneurs. They were mostly Master’s candidates in Computing or Electrical Engineering. And they were demonstrating apps for iPhones and Androids and even your television that were commercial-grade, or could get there.

I spent about a decade as a venture capitalist, and I was IMPRESSED. This was a class project, but it felt like a venture capital event. I started asking them, “Do you want to start a company around this?” I’ve still got friends in the venture business, and I think I could get some of these teams funded!

But the answer was usually a smile, and a quiet “No, I can’t.” So then I figured it out, and I started asking them: “Where are you from?”

Of 28 competitors, 26 were from overseas.

There’s no way that these 26 students can graduate from Georgia Tech and take what they’ve learned here and start companies in the United States.

They want to, but they can’t.

If you can only remember one thing I’ve said this morning, please remember that. We’re educating these children, they want to start companies here, and we’re telling them to go home.

They want to stay, but they can’t.

Removing the caps on H1-Bs wouldn’t help them. Our immigration service doesn’t recognize self-employment. And the kids couldn’t afford the fees, anyhow. So, they can find a big-company employer who is able to invest $20,000 or $30,000 in getting them an H1-B and eventually a green card. Or, they can go home. And, as Elizabeth pointed out, their economies are thriving back home, so it’s more than likely that they’ll compete with us from there!

Now, entrepreneurship is HARD. Most people who try it, fail. I think the willingness to pack your bags and move to a different country for graduate school is a pretty good filter for whether a young person has what it takes to start a successful company. And the data supports that. Over HALF of the startups in Silicon Valley have a founder from India or China.

And, remember, as the Mayor mentioned, the Kauffman Foundation found that young companies have accounted for essentially ALL the job growth in the United States over the last twenty-five years. But our immigration policy doesn’t encourage foreign graduate students to participate in that job creation. Work for a big company, or go home.

Just at Georgia Tech, we’ve seen the impact of this over and over again. One of our spinout companies, Whisper Communications, was based on work from a graduate student in electrical engineering. He jumped through all the immigration hoops possible, but eventually exhausted his options. He gave up.

He was immediately snapped up by Apple, where I figure he’s building the iPhone 6, but it delayed the formation and growth of that company by over a year. We had to bring in new founders without immigration problems.

Who knows what could have happened in that year? And I’m sure our former student is contributing economic value working for Apple, but nothing like what he could be doing in a startup.

John Doerr, one of the most successful venture capitalists in history, said “I would staple a green card to the diploma of anyone that graduates with an advanced degree in the physical sciences or engineering in the United States.” He’s absolutely right.

These people are going to create value. Create jobs. Pay taxes, for crying out loud! Why would we NOT want them to stay here? Get married, raise families, buy a house, buy 2.3 cars… the multipliers are endless.

Now, what I always hear when I speak on this subject is that “immigrants take jobs from Americans.” The Mayor already addressed this. That’s just not true for entrepreneurial immigrants! They don’t TAKE jobs, they MAKE jobs!

First for themselves, then for co-founders, and eventually—if successful—for hundreds, or, thousands of employees.

This is NOT a zero-sum game. If these immigrants aren’t allowed to create jobs, those jobs WILL NOT go to native-born Americans… those jobs simply won’t exist.

And these aren’t jobs flipping burgers or picking crops. These are high-quality high-paying jobs that your kids would like to have someday. Example: There are two million “Internet jobs” in the United States. None of those jobs existed twenty years ago. Most of the COMPANIES didn’t exist twenty years ago. Now, subtract all of those Silicon Valley companies who were founded by immigrants. It’s a pretty ugly picture.

And although Silicon Valley gets all the press, it’s deeper than that. As a bit of history, not just Google and Intel, but Pfizer, DuPont, U.S. Steel, and Procter & Gamble were once startups founded by immigrants.

Earlier, Alejandro repeated the cliché that “we are a nation of immigrants.” It’s a cliché, but it’s also true. We still have the world’s best graduate schools; other countries are catching up, but we started from far ahead.

Moreover… We have a history of risk-taking, of capital fluidity, and of tolerance of failure that has made the U.S. the best place in the world to start a company. Other countries are catching up here, too, but our culture and history give us an edge. Even with our current financial troubles, I believe that we’re still the entrepreneurial Mecca for the world.

But we have to make sure that we attract the best, brightest, and most innovative entrepreneurs, whether they were born here or not.

In honor of the Mayor, i made up a baseball analogy, but he beat me to it. Building fences to keep out brainpower is like saying that “My baseball team has enough talent, let the other teams get some good players, too.” That’s not how the Yankees play the game, and it’s not how the United States should play the game.

With that, I’ll pass the microphone and look forward to the rest of the panel. Thank you.

 

Ironically, with his fat pasty skin and obsolete tech skills (his words), this douche would be a HUGE mark for any Indian slumdog scab, and would be forced train his curry-scented replacement immediately, that is, IF HE HAD A REAL FUCKIN' JOB.

BUT NO, he feeds at the trough of public dollars, promoting imported students and denigrinating the "dumbass crackers" (his words) from America that manage to work their way into places like Georgia Tech.  And speaking of Hitler, Indian students LOVE HITLER.

FUCK YOU STEPHEN FLEMING.

Sorry for the outburst, but for this douche collaborator, there can only be four words:

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION

 


Don Tennant at ITBusinessEdge.com has been, until recently, a vigorous peddler of propaganda and lies supporting the slumdog slave trade. The insurgency has been hammering him hard for months, and obviously getting under his skin.  I've been banned from even reading his blog, and even politically correct, articulate insurgents like Donna Conroy of BrightFutureJobs.com have been admonished by "Mubai Don" for not toeing the party line when it comes to the Indian Outsourcing Regime.  He frequentlty baited and taunted American techies, going so far as to issue thinly-vield threats of blacklisting anybody who crossed him.

But recently, he started blogging about the crimes committed by Infosys, and the ethnic cleansing of Americans at Cisco, and something must have snapped.  Or perhaps some insurgents paid a visit to his Maine residence and asked him to ponder the wisdom of shipping young men his son's age to die in Iraq and Afghanistan while we import tons of young marble-mouthed retards from India to do nothing but chair warming and booger farming. 

Either way, here is his Mea Culpa:

I Was Wrong — The H-1B Visa Program Must Be Abolished

Posted by Don Tennant                Jun 6, 2011 9:35:59 PM

In the 10 years or so that I’ve been writing about the H-1B visa program, I have steadfastly argued that despite rampant abuse of the system, the positive contributions of many, many people here on H-1B visas warrant continued support of the program. I was wrong. The H-1B visa program needs to be abolished.

It has long been my view that our focus should be on fighting abuse of the program, rather than on fighting for its annihilation. I have been so sickened for so long by the hatefulness of anti-H-1B fanatics who have capitalized on the issue to spew anti-foreigner venom that I was compelled to find every reason I could to support what they hate. I have argued for years that the hatefulness is horribly damaging to the effort to fix the H-1B program, and I feel as strongly about that now as I ever have. But what I have come to recognize is that the H-1B program in irreparable. So I was wrong to support its continued existence.

It wasn’t an easy conclusion to come to. I remain humbled and inspired by the examples set by many families whose outstanding accomplishments here have been made possible by the H-1B program. I remain blown away by the fact the 60 percent of the finalists in the 2011 Intel Science Talent Search competition are the children of parents who came to the United States on H-1B visas, and I see absolutely no reason to try to discredit that competition or those findings as a means of discrediting the H-1B program. I remain blown away by the stories of people like Dan Simpelo, a high school senior in New City, N.Y., whose family came here from the Philippines four years ago, and whose father had come here two years earlier on an H-1B visa. Dan, whose first language is not English, was the valedictorian of his graduating class of 390 seniors. It’s very difficult for me to call for the abolition of a visa program that has made stories like that possible. But I had no choice.

What changed for me is that finally — finally — the voice of reason has drowned out the voice of hate. There’s no better example than the string of hundreds of reader comments that were contributed in response to my recent post, "Will H-1B Visa Holders Feel the Pain of Impending Cisco Layoffs?" Yes, that reader commentary was spiked with the requisite bickering and mean-spiritedness that have marred the discussion on both sides all along. But what predominated was reasoned, compelling, substantiated information contributed by knowledgeable, thoughtful individuals whose inclination is to challenge and document abuse of the program rather than deride and lambast the individuals who hold the visas the program has created.

One of the most reasoned, sensible and articulate voices in opposition to the H-1B program has been that of Roy Lawson, a software developer in Florida who regularly contributes his commentary to the postings here. He made several comments in response to the aforementioned post, none more important than the one in which he conveyed this viewpoint:

I believe [the H-1B program] is flawed beyond repair, and as such it needs to be abolished in favor of something smarter. I believe that corporations should not be immigration middle-men. Immigration is about something much more pure and sacrosanct than corporate profits. I believe it needs to be abolished in favor of permanent immigration, self sponsorship as opposed to corporate sponsorship, the favoring of relatives (families) over new immigrants, and sustainable numbers. I would limit new immigration to 25% of net job gains each year. In years where we have job loss, I would restrict immigration. Finally, certainly more people would apply than we have openings for. I would make the acceptance based on merit, not first come or a lottery. … My case is about economics and national interest, and has nothing to do with race. In fact, I want greater protections for immigrants. I believe the reason they are so easily exploited is because of corporate sponsorship. Green cards (in sustainable numbers) would make them equal players in the labor market. An H-1b visa amounts to second class labor and corporate sponsorship gives companies leverage against your wages and salary. This hurts you directly and it hurts us indirectly – because we now must compete against workers who are easily exploited.

While some of his points are fodder for additional legitimate debate, in essence, Roy is right. I want to express my thanks to him and to all of the other readers who have worked so diligently to make the anti-H-1B argument not only in a way that is convincing, but in a way that upholds the principles of honor, compassion, fairness and decency that our country stands for. I’m proud to join you in opposition to the H-1B program.

Don cites Roy Lawson as his saviour.  Roy used to be a finger wagging scold in the movement, contantly harping on the insurgents to stop talking about the Indians, but of late Roy has trafficked heavily in the connection between Hindoos and Nazis, and the caste system that is part of the slumdog DNA.  As I always say, I'd rather be perceived a racist than confirmed a coward.

Now, the shills for the H-1B visa are few and far between.  Most don't need the redicule and shaming (and even death threats) that come with a puff-piece proclaiming the intellectual superiority of slumdogs and the lie that we need them to run our IT departments.  Business Week had Moira Herbst and Steve Hamm (and Vivek Fraudwha) who made up what I used to call the Tandoori Trifecta, but now all that is left to peddle the NASSCOM lies is the Punjabi Professor.  Moira interviewed me by phone, and then her editor had to make a groveling apology to IVers who threatened to rape her and throw acid in his face if they did not remove the link to my blog.  She hasn't been heard from since Bloomberg bought Business Week.  As for Steve Hamm, who, after spending years working as a shill for NASSCOM, did a hard-hitting piece called "America's High-Tech Sweatshops" and then ran off work at Indian Bowel Movement (IBM).

Even NASSCOM agent Vivek Wadhwa has tired of the threats and stalking that come with the territory, and slinked off to the Washington Post to write mushy crap about "innovation" and "immigrants" with not a mention of fuckin' H-1Bs.  Fellow Desi shill Farhad Manjoo regurgitated one article with Wadhwa's lies, and was last seen crying to the FBI and blogging on Slate about the lastest iPhone.

There really is nothing left for the H-1Bs now.  They are slowly getting shitcanned at American companies, and forced to become illegal aliens, working at motels, cigar shops, and dry cleaners.  Of course, that beats the hell out of going back to India, which even the enlightened New York Times has deemed a stinking shithole full feral racist scum.  Even at Vivek's new home at the Washington Post, over 700 commenters countered the biased notion that H-1Bs are somehow smarter than the locals.  The Hispanics are also getting the hint, and are tiring of being denigrated as criminals by the chest-thumping Indians that proclaim themselves to be the "better brown immigrants."

 

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION

 

 


tunnel rat posted on October 16, 2010 12:11

From fellow insurgent Rob Oak:

The Chamber’s anti-American jobs agenda serves not only the profit-seeking of right-wing corporate executives in the United States, but also works to send jobs overseas to the following outsourcing companies, who are some of the dozens of foreign corporations that pay member dues to the Chamber of Commerce’s 501c(6) account, which is used to fund its political ads:

InfoSys, Bangalore, India (at least $15,000 in annual member dues): “Infosys is the ‘Best Outsourcing Partner’ according to the Waters Rankings for the third consecutive year.”

KPIT Cummins, Pune, India ($7,500): “Strategic global networking, together with industry-proven practices & processes, give KPIT Cummins a cutting edge in the realm of outsourcing.”

Patni Americas, Mumbai, India ($15,000): “Patni, the world leader in IT outsourcing and business process outsourcing provides offshore software development, global sourcing, custom software development, and a vast array of product engineering and IT services to companies worldwide.”

NIIT Technologies, Delhi, India ($15,000): “[L]eadership in the area of outsourcing.”

QuEST Global, Singapore ($7,500): “QuEST is a leader in the engineering services outsourcing (ESO) space.”

Rolta, Mumbai, India ($7,500): “Rolta’s global footprint and track record along with its capable off-shoring model gives it a unique positioning in this large market.”

SKP Crossborder Consulting, Mumbai, India ($7,500): “SKP’s core outsourcing practice is managed out of a fully equipped, spacious premises based in Pune with access to facilities in Mumbai, Hyderabad, Delhi and Bangalore.”

Tata Group, Mumbai, India ($15,000): “[W]orld-class solutions in outsourcing – business process outsourcing, application outsourcing, infrastructure outsourcing.”

Wipro, Bangalore, India ($15,000): “India’s biggest destination for U.S. offshoring.”

Trust me, there will be retribution for Tom Donohue, the slumdog shill that heads the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

 


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tunnel rat posted on August 18, 2010 23:33

I was going through my web logs, collecting info about the scumbag slumdogs that are posting harassing comments on my site, and came across this nugget from 2005.  Look at how these filthy jackals live!  WTF?  And this is what that pussy Vivek Wadhwa promotes!

In June 2005, I got the opportunity to visit a programmer friend working for the International Business Software Solutions, Inc., also known as IBSS. This company hires and trains software consultants. The consultants then work on projects for various U.S. companies.

You know, what struck me was the lengths at which these consultants go to secure a project at a U.S. company. This may include fake experience on their resumes, fake references, and even fake degrees! In today's economy, many IT companies in the US are hiring only American trained software professionals, and some of these consultants even develop fake accents for their phone interviews!

During the 1 week I spent at IBSS, I remember a typical 'hunt for a project': One guy, Kabir, got invited for a telephone interview. However, the interviewing company suspected that this guy was located in India, due to his heavy accent! Anyways, the company asked for his *US cellular number*, which fortunately, Kabir provided. Kabir even provided fake references - one of which included a friend. Furthermore, Kabir also read things off his resume, which he didn't have any idea about. The interview went fine, but, Kabir didn't get a position at the interviewing company. They told him he was not up the their technical expectations.

 

I found my friend living at the IBSS "Guest House", an 2-bedroom apartment holding 6 men. All these men had a few things in common: They were Indian and were promised a large salary at IBSS. The guest house apartments are located at Deer Creek Dr., Plainsboro, NJ. The consultants were promised a high paying project with the company, and yet, they were simply playing the waiting game. I felt very sorry for them. I was talking to one guy - his name was Aniketh. Aniketh was a project supervisor at IBM-India. He was promised a very high salary at IBSS. Unable to resist a chance to live and work in America, Aniketh resigned from his job in India (Yup, IBSS hired consultants with the stipulation that the consultant resign from his previous job!). However, in America, things were very different. After IBSS issued a H1B visa for Aniketh, he was asked to look for his own project, until then, the company would pay him $20 per day and a free stay at the guest house. 7 months had passed, and there was no sign of a project. Why should he get a project? The IT industry in the US in down in the pits. The handful of companies that are hiring only hire US trained programmers.

BTW, these IBSS motherfuckers are still in business, although not for long, thanks to the Neufeld Memo that makes their business ILLEGAL.


The Insurgency is having a profound impact.  Even shills for the Indian Outsourcing Regime (IOR), like freelance writer Wayne Rash, are taking notice.  He remarks that the slumdogs are now too scared to try to come to the USA, because they might get called names!

Too bad, scabs.

On Monday, July 26, a column I wrote on eWEEK about the diminishing number of applications for H-1B visas appeared, and was immediately followed by a string of comments that expressed a shocking level of racism, hate, bigotry and pure mean-spiritedness. I had everything from threats of violence against foreign workers using H-1B visas to insults. The experience was so unpleasant, and the comments in some cases so libelous, that I asked the editors to pull the entire comments section, and to disable the ability to leave comments.

http://www.ctoedge.com/content/h-1b-visa-delivers-hate-not-applications?page=1

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


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