Tunnel Rat posted on February 28, 2014 13:50

WHEN INDIANS TAKE OVER IT’S TIME TO EXIT

Now that Microsoft has succumbed to a new Indian CEO (no don’t call them asians they are half negroid middle easterners) it’s fate is sealed, all it’s wealth and monopoly will be gone in five to ten years until sucked dry by Indians it will be no more than a decaying emaciated corpse rotting in the sun (just like Sun rotted after bringing on Indians!)...

-Link

 

India’s emerging market rollercoaster has been a brutal ride for IBM

...Other problems started to crop up. In the fiscal year to March, 2012, employees in IBM’s Indian software division unit inflated revenues by $8 million in order to meet financial targets. The company fired two dozen employees in India because of the fraud. In the fiscal year to March 2013, IBM detected another instance of fraud which overstated revenues by about $10 million, Livemint reported, citing documents filed with the Indian government...

-Link

 

 

THE PSYCHOTIC INDIAN VIEW OF THE H-1B RAPE OF AMERICAN ENGINEERS

...Indian outsourcing companies realized that they are dealing with an average America and not that rich America. American dollar fell, gold and oil prices rose. The economic decline of the super power was silent but catastrophic.

Today the flagging U.S. economy is the major reason why nearly 40,000 H-1B visa application slots are currently unused, and an additional 9,000 slots in the Masters Exemption program are still open. It is not just the economy. Lots of factors are playing their part.

According to Wayne Rash at eweek.com, the economy is party responsible. India’s talented youth today can enjoy American dream right in their own country. A high tech Bangalore IT job is far more lucrative than coming to US, getting abused by Immigration, law enforcement, face burocracy, racism, lose freedom, family and friends, good food, culture and just “home sweet home!”

These youth of India are vibrant, independent, and free. They come to US for vacation and not for high tech slavery like their previous generation did. India has finally toppled the West in its own game.

The reason why H1B is so unpopular is because America economy is weak and America is no longer a desirable place for immigrants to achieve American dream.

The American dream is in India today. Sooner or later Americans will travel to India and work there to find what their ancestors once used to call American dream and prosperity...

- Link


It is now official, now that the Wall Street Journal has stopped being the cheerleaders for more H-1Bs.  And it is also amazing that the "Indian outsourcing giants" can call this bill discriminatory when they refuse hire Americans to staff consulting gigs in the US, and instead turn every fucking project they take over it a nepotistic curry den:

A fight is brewing between Washington and New Delhi over provisions in the U.S.'s draft immigration bill that could hobble Indian outsourcing firms' businesses in the U.S.

The proposals, which include cutting back sharply on the number of foreign workers these outsourcing companies can send to their U.S. offices, have won broad support from rival U.S. technology firms, including International Business Machines Corp. IBM +0.05% and Accenture ACN +1.98% PLC, lobbyists say.

India's $110 billion IT industry, which performs back-office tasks such as software programming, makes about half its revenue from the U.S.

Indian companies such as Infosys Ltd., 500209.BY -0.84% Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. 532540.BY -1.16% and Wipro Ltd. 507685.BY -0.82% have set up large U.S. offices to be closer to clients, staffing the sites overwhelmingly with Indian expatriates, who earn significantly less than their American counterparts.

The model has been challenged in recent years by U.S. politicians, who argue Indian outsourcing companies are misusing the program to undercut local technology-sector workers.

Now, big U.S. tech companies, which want to hire more foreign workers but can't because of competition with Indian firms for available visas, have joined the fray.

U.S. tech firms successfully lobbied for the draft immigration bill to include caps on the number of foreign workers a U.S.-based company can employ on skilled-worker visas, according to lobbyists working for U.S. firms and another representing Indian outsourcers.

The bill doesn't name countries. But Indian outsourcing giants sponsor more than half the 65,000 skilled-worker permits, known as H1-B visas, that the U.S. issues annually to workers with at least a bachelor's degree.

Many of these firms have as much as 80% of their staff in the U.S. on H1-B and other visas. The draft legislation, which is being debated in the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, would prohibit companies with more than 75% of their employees in the U.S. on such visas from bringing in additional workers. That figure would fall to 65% within a year, and in the years after that the limit would be 50%.

IBM and Accenture declined to comment.

The U.S. firms are seeking to hire more foreign workers for high-skilled jobs but face a visa shortage because of competition with Indian firms.

Earlier this month, U.S.-based employers exhausted the annual 65,000-person quota for H1-B visas within days of the opening of applications, a sign of the strengthening domestic economy.

The immigration bill also seeks to raise the yearly cap on H1-B visas to 180,000. The cap on foreign workers means U.S. companies could benefit, while Indian firms would have to hire more U.S. employees.

Firms that don't comply will be barred from sending consultants to work in clients' offices, a business that accounts for roughly 50% of Indian companies' revenue in the U.S.

The foreign-worker caps were designed to get political backing to increase the number of available H1-B visas, people familiar with the negotiations said, and U.S. firms were concerned that a broader curb on visas would reduce their ability to hire more from overseas amid a dearth of U.S. computer graduates

Som Mittal, president of the National Association of Software and Services Companies, an India IT trade body, warned the bill was "discriminatory" and might ignite a trade war. The association estimates the regulations could wipe out a quarter of the Indian IT sector's global revenue.

Indian Finance Minister P. Chidambaram raised concerns about the bill with U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew during a meeting last week in Washington. He told Mr. Lew the issue of short-term work visas shouldn't be mixed up with immigration, according to an account of the meeting Mr. Chidambaram gave to Indian media.

Commercial relations between the nations are already tense because of recent Indian regulations that would impose a sweeping "Buy India" mandate, requiring that large portions of high-tech products purchased by the government be manufactured locally. U.S. and other foreign companies are lobbying against the rules, saying they conflict with free-trade norms. Other areas of contention include India's efforts to increase its tax haul, which overseas companies complain has caused confusion for investors.

India argues the provisions are needed to curb technology imports from the U.S. and spur domestic manufacturing.

Indian companies claim the U.S.'s latest proposals to restrict visas could also amount to restrictions on free trade.

But many U.S. members of Congress contend India is misusing the H-1B system to bring in fairly low-skilled employees, denying those places to higher-skilled workers that U.S. firms want to hire.

On Monday, at a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss the immigration bill, Brad Smith, Microsoft Corp.'s MSFT +3.79% chief counsel, said the company couldn't get enough visas for high-skilled jobs that it can't fill through hiring in the U.S.

"We are not able to fill all the jobs that we are creating," Mr. Smith said in testimony. He told the committee that Indian outsourcing firms must "evolve their business models" by hiring more Americans.

Microsoft and IBM have recently expanded their presence in India, where they have hired thousands of local employees.

Sen. Richard Durbin (D., Ill.) said in response that the situation was an abuse of the visa regime. "Most people would think, well, Microsoft needs these folks," he said. "And they'd be shocked to know that most of the H-1B visas are not going to companies like yours. They're going to these outsourcing companies."

Indian firms say that over the past three years, in anticipation of the visa changes, they began hiring U.S. employees at a faster rate than new foreign workers.

Nasscom, the association of Indian IT firms, said the efforts faced roadblocks because of a lack of qualified U.S. graduates.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2013, the U.S. economy will create approximately 120,000 new jobs for people with degrees in computer science.

In his testimony before the Senate committee, Mr. Smith of Microsoft said that, by his own company's calculations, U.S. colleges produce under half that number of graduates annually.

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323551004578441070153741766.html


There is some great news for those American techies victimized by the high-tech junta and the slumdog slave traders -- the tide is turning.  What used to be a steady drip of pro-H-1B propaganda dished out by the likes of the Wall Street Journal, the Republican party, and other organs of the plutocracy is now becoming an anti-H-1B torrent of facts, reason, and sympathy for those displaced, denigrated, and discriminated by the Indian Offshoring/Outsourcing Regime.

Here's a quick summary of recent stories:

Norman Matloff released a study laying waste to the myth that foreign workers are smarter than Americans:

http://www.epi.org/publication/bp356-foreign-students-best-brightest-immigration-policy/

That study got positive coverage in several forums:

http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2013/02/h1b-visa-bloomberg-foreign-workers-smarter

http://www.informationweek.com/global-cio/h1b/h-1b-workers-not-best-or-brightest-study/240149839

In another article, Sam Harnett of PRI got excoriated by commenters disgusted with his take on Stanford PhD from India scamming her way to an H-1B visa:

http://www.theworld.org/2013/03/skilled-worker-visa/

Our old friend Don Tennant, who we used to call Mumbai Don for his pro-slumdog coverage, has turned a new leaf after the Jay Palmer/Infosys case and is now doing good coverage about a criminal indictment of slumdog bodyshop Dibon Solutions:

http://www.itbusinessedge.com/blogs/from-under-the-rug/u.s.-officials-in-texas-arrest-six-on-charges-of-h-1b-visa-fraud.html

On a personal note, I am now seeing less anecdotal evidence of companies going out of their way to fill their IT staffing needs by hiring slumdogs.  It may take years, but eventually the bottom line catches up to reality and corporations learn what a fraud the typical slumdog programmer is.  Wages are rising in my field, and I am now making close to what I was in the dot-com boom, and 50% more than I made when I was at the notorious Curry Den four years ago. 

 


I have to admit that I was once what you would call a "right-wing wacko" and Paul Krugman was one of my favorite targets.  But like they say, a Democrat is a Republican who hasn't been raped, and a Republican is a Democrat who has not had their job outsourced/off-shored.  I'm have no loyalty to either party, and think both Dems and Republicans are sucking at the tit of the Indian Offshoring Regime and the High-Tech Junta. 

But one cannot argue with Krugman's statement:

Whenever you see some business person quoted complaining about how he or she can’t find workers with the necessary skills, ask what wage they’re offering. Almost always, it turns out that what said business person really wants is highly (and expensively) educated workers at a manual-labor wage. No wonder they come up short.

 

Listen up, you collaborators that like cheap, compliant, foreign scab labor.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


Finally, somebody besides Don Tennant or Patrick Thibodeau is covering the looming Infosys trial:

 

Infosys Visa Fraud Trial Should Leave CIOs ‘Worried’

Infosys, the Indian IT outsourcing giant, is headed to court this month, to face allegations that it committed visa fraud to bring workers to the United States, and then tried to intimidate a whistleblower. Immigration and outsourcing experts say recent scrutiny facing the practice means CIOs need to be more vigilant when monitoring outsourcing firms who work onsite, or face harm to company reputation, and even legal consequences and the deportation of staff.

The civil suit, filed by a former consultant with the firm, alleges that Infosys improperly used short-term business travel documents, known as B1 visas, to bring Indian workers to the United States to work on client sites. The case will go to federal court in Alabama on August 20, after attempts at a settlement collapsed last week.

Jack Palmer, the former employee, claims he was asked to fill out paperwork for the employee travel visas, falsely representing the purposes of these trips as short visits for meetings. When he refused and reported the violations to the company’s corporate counsel, Palmer alleges Infosys managers retaliated by withholding bonuses and pulling him off job sites. Infosys also did not withhold federal or state taxes from these employees, the suit alleges. Infosys is now the target of a federal criminal investigation, probing its use of visitor visas, the company stated in a corporate filing in May.

“There is not and never has been a policy to use B1 visas to circumnavigate visa policies,” said Danielle D’Angelo, a spokeswoman for Infosys. “We have never retaliated against any employee and any allegations that say otherwise are simply not accurate.”

The practice of improperly using business travel visas is common for outsourcers that send workers to client sites, said Phil Fersht, CEO of HfS, an outsourcing research firm. The H1B work visa–the appropriate document for longer-term onsite work–costs companies thousands of dollars per employee and the federal government has reduced their availability in recent years. “Outsourcers are trying to get staff to work an engagement as quickly as possible and they will work the system as much as possible,” Fersht said.

CIOs contemplating the hiring of on-site outsourcers can expose their companies to grave reputational harm if they don’t ask the right questions, Fersht said. “They should be worried.”

Even if the client company has no knowledge of outsourcer visa policies, it can be named in legal actions surrounding the case, like numerous Fortune 500 companies named in the Infosys civil case documents. “I don’t think any American organization wants their name attached to foreign employees on incorrect visas, in widely publicized court battles,” Fersht said.

To avoid this reputational harm Fersht says CIOs should push outsourcers to ensure that workers brought into the office are on the correct visa. “They’ve got every right to validate the immigration status of every employee sitting in their office.”

James Nolan, a New York-based immigration attorney, says CIOs who use outsourcers could also find themselves in legal hot water if they help facilitate a visa under false pretenses. CIOs may be asked by a foreign outsourcer to provide the “welcome” document needed for a business travel visa, which states that an outsourced employee is coming into the country for a meeting or training. But if he knows the worker will actually do longer-term work onsite, he could be committing immigration fraud, Nolan said. “If it’s ongoing and systematic, they could be prosecuted,” he said.

CIOs who use outsourcers who are not aboveboard on immigration issues also risk being left with projects incomplete, if a crackdown leads to workers being deported, said Ben Trowbridge, CEO of Alsbridge, an outsourcing consulting firm. “If your provider has to have people sent back, an essential system can go down because of the disruption to the team,” Trowbridge said.

http://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2012/08/01/infosys-visa-fraud-trial-should-leave-cios-worried/

 


Tunnel Rat posted on May 25, 2012 22:50
I urge all American techies to call the number at the end of this article and report any slumdogs, collaborators, or Desi managers that are in engaged in the ethnic cleansing of American IT workers:

The Justice Department filed a lawsuit today against Whiz International LLC, an information technology staffing company in Jersey City, N.J., regarding allegations that the company violated the anti-discrimination provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) when it terminated an employee in retaliation for expressing opposition to Whiz’s alleged preference for foreign nationals with temporary work visas.

The complaint alleges that the company directed an employee that served as a receptionist and a recruiter, to prefer certain noncitizens in its recruitment efforts and then terminated the employee when she expressed discomfort with excluding U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents from consideration. The anti-discrimination provision prohibits employers from retaliating against workers who oppose a practice that is illegal under the statute or who attempt to assert rights under the statute.
 
“Employers cannot punish employees who try to do the right thing and take reasonable measures to shed light on a practice they believe may be discriminatory,” said Thomas E. Perez, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division. “Employers must ensure that their practices conform to the anti-discrimination provision of the INA, and retaliation will not be tolerated.”

The complaint seeks a court order prohibiting future discrimination by the respondent, monetary damages to the employee, as well as civil penalties. 
 
The Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC) is responsible for enforcing the anti-discrimination provisions of the INA, which protect U.S. citizens and certain work-authorized individuals from citizenship status discrimination.  The INA also protects work-authorized individuals from national origin discrimination, over-documentation in the employment eligibility verification process and retaliation.


For more information about protections against employment discrimination under the immigration laws, call 1-800-255-7688 (OSC’s worker hotline) (1-800-237-2525, TDD for hearing impaired), 1-800-255-8155 (OSC’s employer hotline) (1-800-362-2735, TDD for hearing impaired), sign up for a no-cost webinar at  www.justice.gov/crt/about/osc/webinars.php, email osccrt@usdoj.gov, or visit the website at www.justice.gov/crt/about/osc/. Civil Rights Division Trial Attorney Liza Zamd represents the department in this matter.


tunnel rat posted on December 11, 2011 16:05

This ad is now running on the Sunday talk shows.  I am seeing more and more comments about H-1Bs in the many articles that pop up now regarding the massive unemployment in America

You can find many of these slumdogs roaming around the office parks that surround big cities.  They are easy to spot -- goofy clothes and backpacks.  They are warehoused in extended-stay motels that are common in these office parks. 

Here are a couple of scabs that I had under surveilance the other day.  I drive a black Impala that looks like a gov't vehicle, so I like to freak out those curry-eating-wage-pirates.

 


tunnel rat posted on November 13, 2011 23:38

Here's a speech I gave at my local Occupation's Veteran's Day celebration:

When I was four years old, my father fled the Communist regime of Hungary.  He took me to Yugoslavia, drugged me up with sleeping pills, tied me to an inflatable raft, and in the dead of night, swam two miles across the Adriatic Sea to Italy.  After nine months in an Italian refugee camp, we made our way to New York City.

I would not see my mother or brother for 15 years, when they finally came to America after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

At the age of 20, I wanted money for college and curiously walked in to a Marine Recruiting office.  I was interviewed by a recruiter.

“Do you like the outdoors?” he asked.  I guess so, I thought. Sure, I like the outdoors.

“Good.  I recommend Marine Corps infantry,” he said.

He assured me that I would get tens of thousands of dollars for college, and the Marine Corps would help me get my citizenship.  And that I would make enough money to buy a car, and to go to school while I was on active duty…

I would later learn that he was the top Marine recruiter in the nation that year, and most of what he promised was not exactly true.

A year later, I was in boot camp, standing at attention.  A drill instructor asked me why I joined the Marine Corps.  I didn’t want to say “I needed money for college and I was bored” so I told him what I thought he might want to hear.

“To kill communists, sir.” 

Two years later, I was in a helicopter flying into Kuwait on day one of the ground war called Operation Desert Storm.  Our platoon sergeant gave the signal to invert our loaded M-16s, and the door gunner pulled back the bolt on the 50-cal machine gun.  Fortunately for me, we were not going into a hot LZ, just a barren stretch of desert soon to be overrun by starving shell-shocked Iraqi soldiers begging to surrender.  People ask me if I was scared then.  I say no.  I don’t know why I wasn’t scared back then.  The Marine Corps has a way of doing that men.

Maybe, and I quote freely from “Full Metal Jacket”:

“The Marine Corps does not want robots.

The Marine Corps wants killers.

The Marine Corps wants to build indestructible men.

Men without fear.”

Unlike my brothers and sisters serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, my war was brutal and short.  I, like most of the 500,000 other troops, made it home safe. 

I eventually did use some of that money that the recruiter promised I would get for college.  I got my citizenship, and left the Marine Corps in 1993.

I found work in the computer business, becoming a contract programmer for large Fortune 500 companies. 

I always thought that having my Marine Corps experience on my resume would be a plus; that is until the dot-com boom.  Suddenly, IT became filled with eager liberal arts majors, building websites in their trendy offices while their dogs slept under their desks. 

I would go to interviews with my short hair, suit, and wing-tips, and be the only one wearing a tie.  I took my Marine Corp experience off of my resume, and started getting offers again.

I’ve been in the “closet,” so to speak, for over ten years now, not wanting to let stereotypes and people’s pre-conceptions about the military influence their opinion of me. 

And this may be for good reason.  A couple years ago, I started a new job at a big local company.  I overheard two managers discussing some programming candidates that were coming in for interviews.  One manager mentioned that a candidate had served in the Marines, and that they would need to do a thorough background check, just in case he has “anger issues.”

I bit my tongue.  I have anger issues, and it is not because I served in the Marines. 

I HAVE ANGER ISSUES BECAUSE I WORK FOR CHICKENSHIT MIDDLE MANAGERS WHO THINK ALL VETS ARE CRAZED PSYCHOS.

Which brings me to the Occupy movement. 

One of the things I have seen in my career in IT is the rampant discrimination, displacement, and denigration of American workers as companies outsourced and offshored as many tech jobs as possible.  When they could not offshore the work, they brought in cheap guest workers who were essentially indentured servants and made the locals train them. 

Train your replacement, or you will not get your severance package, many were told. 

I witnessed this firsthand. 

A few years ago, I was working on a web project at a large local company.  One of the guys I worked with was a gray haired Vietnam vet named Joe. Joe was a legend at that company. He had seen it all, and lived to talk about it. He knew where the bodies where buried.  And he also had a son that had committed suicide, and he volunteered at nights at the Crystal Cathedral, running a suicide hotline.

I loved Joe like a brother.

He was a warrior, a guy that still could keep up with the latest technologies, even though he was pushing sixty. He had just had a kidney replacement, and the drugs made it hard for him to stay awake in boring meetings. Can't say I blame him. Those meetings sucked.

Joe and I bonded. He would give me shit about the Marines, and I would talk trash about the Army. I taught him about web development, and he taught me about life. His devotion to the spirit of his dead son was epic.

One day, something weird was going on. First one of our chickenshit managers came over and tapped the programmer sitting next to me on the shoulder and I never saw him again. Then they came for another one.  I made some calls. They were all getting fired, escorted out.

Joe comes in at about 10 AM, and I tell him about the executions. Good thing it wasn't him, we joke.

Ten minutes later, the collaborators come for Joe. They wouldn't even let him pack his stuff, just escorted him to a conference room, where he was forced to sign some paperwork in order to get his severance.

Guess who showed up the next day?

Two guest workers from Indian outsourcing giant Infosys, the lead element of what was to be a massive offshoring initiative.  Infosys, by the way, is currently being sued for visa fraud and is under criminal investigation by a Texas grand jury.

The company where Joe and I worked systematically purged senior, high-paid Americans, some vets, some single parents, all good workers and replaced them with foreign guest workers in what could almost be described as occupational apartheid, or what I like to call “ethnic cleansing”; of Americans, that is. 

When I saw a similar pattern of discrimination at my most recent job, I filed an ethics complaint, was promptly put on paid suspension, and eventually terminated.  Fortunately for me, I could fill my days in between jobs involved in the Occupation.

That’s a good thing.  BECAUSE I HAVE ANGER ISSUES.

I am angry at corporations that used the threat of outsourcing and offshoring to drive down the wages of American workers and cut their benefits.

I am angry at seeing grown men, cowering in their cubicles, working unpaid overtime, groveling to their mid-level corporate taskmasters, terrified of losing their jobs.

I am angry about corporations that have turned my chosen profession into a globalist gladiator pit, where I compete with the lowest bidders in a race to the proverbial bottom.

I am tired of knowing that vets have a higher unemployment rate than the regular population.

And while I am angry, I have no fear.  I do not fear the lose of my livelihood, my house, my family.  People ask me if I was afraid of entering the job market again in such an economy. 

No, I fear nothing.  I survived the Marines.  I can survive this.

Now, this is the second war I have fought for my country, and the first one where I knew my enemy.

Yes, I say war, a peaceful revolution.  As John F. Kennedy said:

“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.”

Don’t underestimate the seriousness of this movement.  We are seeking fundamental changes in the way this country operates, and it will be a long war, not a brief skirmish.  And we need to be lucid, patient, and above all, serious. 

I’ll end with some lyrics from the Talking Heads song “Life During Wartime”:

“This ain’t no party, this ain’t no disco,

this ain’t no foolin’ around.

This ain’t no Mudd Club, or C.B.G.B.,

I ain’t got time for that now.”

Godspeed.


 


Stephen Fleming, a collaborator douchebag now hiding at Georgia Tech (WTF is a "Enterprise Innovation Institute" anyway?) had to chime in and support high-tech slave trader Mayor Bloomberg on his obscure blog.  For that, he got a resounding ass-whooping by Insurgents, and resorted to pansy-ass liberal academic whining involving the "Holocaust", and subtly dropping the "I know who your and I have your IP" card. 

Here is the post in its entirety, with its obession with all things brown and curry-scented:

 

Back in June, I blogged about immigration as it affects student entrepreneurs at Georgia Tech. Apparently that qualified me as an expert on immigration policy! Someone at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce noticed what I’d written and invited me to a forum in Washington yesterday on “Immigration and American Competitiveness.”

It gave me a chance to meet Michael Bloomberg, and I strongly recommend that you take the time to listen to his keynote, which is archived on C-SPAN here. He made my points far better than I could have!

But I also enjoyed the panel discussion which followed. If you’re inclined, you can watch the whole thing here. My bit starts at 43:20, and I chime in again around 1:27:10. Since I had my notes on my iPad, I was able to update them in realtime at the event; that text is below.

(FYI, using Pages on the iPad with 40-point Helvetica makes a great personal teleprompter!)

Thanks for inviting me here. I appreciate the opportunity.

I could probably replace my prepared remarks with “What Mike said.” His Honor did a great job.

Although I’m not an academic, I think my role today is to discuss immigration from the point of view of a major research university. And I’d like to follow that with some of the issues with current immigration policies that affect what our students can do AFTER graduation.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with Georgia Tech, we’re the largest engineering school in the United States. But we’re not just big; some folks think we’re pretty good.

U.S. News ranks us as the 4th best engineering school in the U.S. — when the top three are MIT, Stanford, and Cal Berkeley, #4 isn’t a bad place to be.

They rank us as the 7th best public university of all types.

And we’re not just good at one thing. They rank twelve types of engineering degrees — electrical, mechanical, civil, etc. We rank in the Top Ten for eleven of them, and we don’t offer the twelfth.

We’re in Atlanta. As you might expect, since the civil rights era, we have a strong history of graduating minorities. Whether you’re measuring Bachelor’s, Master’s, or Ph.D.’s, we’re Top Ten for African-Americans, for Asian-Americans, and for Hispanics, and for minorities overall.

And we have a lot of foreign students.

Right now, about 7% of our undergraduates and 40% of our graduate students are on foreign visas.

Forty percent. As Tom pointed out, the national average for STEM graduate students is actually over 50%. And as Robin pointed out it’s north of 60% in computer science.

At Georgia Tech, the bulk of our foreign students come from, unsurprisingly, India, China, and Korea. But, overall, they come from 115 countries. –I don’t think I could name 115 countries!– Overall, between graduate and undergraduate, that’s 18% of our total enrollment, or about 3800 out of 21,000 students.

It’s hard to get into Georgia Tech. We get six applications for every slot in our freshman class, so you know that we’re pretty picky about who we let in. The 3800 foreign students on our campus are the best of the best. Smart, hard-working, flexible… you couldn’t ask for better students. Or better employees. Or better CITIZENS.

But the United States has put up barriers to letting these students build their careers in America. Just getting their student visas approved — not even talking yet about permanent residency! — is a bureaucratic nightmare. It discourages many of them to just give up, and study in other countries.

It didn’t used to be that way. A hundred years ago, the United States had, at best, a second-tier set of colleges and universities. Harvard was pretty good, but things fell off pretty rapidly from there. But, by 1950, we had unquestionably the finest higher education system in the world. We still have it today, although the rest of the world is trying hard to catch up.

What happened? IMMIGRATION. Our university system in this country was BUILT on immigration.

Specifically, Hitler came to power in 1933 and destroyed the German university system, which at that time was the finest in the world. Many of those professors, and even students, escaped to Britain and the United States. That won the war. Imagine the Manhattan Project without Jewish scientists. Imagine if they’d stayed in Germany.

After World War II, Europe was wrecked, and even MORE came to the United States from all over the Continent.

And then from Latin America, and from Asia… We imported the best brains from all over the world into our colleges and universities. And that led to a half-century of unchallenged economic dominance.

A couple of months ago, I was at a Georgia Tech student event, the Convergence Innovation Competition. I was INCREDIBLY impressed by the quality of the student entrepreneurs. They were mostly Master’s candidates in Computing or Electrical Engineering. And they were demonstrating apps for iPhones and Androids and even your television that were commercial-grade, or could get there.

I spent about a decade as a venture capitalist, and I was IMPRESSED. This was a class project, but it felt like a venture capital event. I started asking them, “Do you want to start a company around this?” I’ve still got friends in the venture business, and I think I could get some of these teams funded!

But the answer was usually a smile, and a quiet “No, I can’t.” So then I figured it out, and I started asking them: “Where are you from?”

Of 28 competitors, 26 were from overseas.

There’s no way that these 26 students can graduate from Georgia Tech and take what they’ve learned here and start companies in the United States.

They want to, but they can’t.

If you can only remember one thing I’ve said this morning, please remember that. We’re educating these children, they want to start companies here, and we’re telling them to go home.

They want to stay, but they can’t.

Removing the caps on H1-Bs wouldn’t help them. Our immigration service doesn’t recognize self-employment. And the kids couldn’t afford the fees, anyhow. So, they can find a big-company employer who is able to invest $20,000 or $30,000 in getting them an H1-B and eventually a green card. Or, they can go home. And, as Elizabeth pointed out, their economies are thriving back home, so it’s more than likely that they’ll compete with us from there!

Now, entrepreneurship is HARD. Most people who try it, fail. I think the willingness to pack your bags and move to a different country for graduate school is a pretty good filter for whether a young person has what it takes to start a successful company. And the data supports that. Over HALF of the startups in Silicon Valley have a founder from India or China.

And, remember, as the Mayor mentioned, the Kauffman Foundation found that young companies have accounted for essentially ALL the job growth in the United States over the last twenty-five years. But our immigration policy doesn’t encourage foreign graduate students to participate in that job creation. Work for a big company, or go home.

Just at Georgia Tech, we’ve seen the impact of this over and over again. One of our spinout companies, Whisper Communications, was based on work from a graduate student in electrical engineering. He jumped through all the immigration hoops possible, but eventually exhausted his options. He gave up.

He was immediately snapped up by Apple, where I figure he’s building the iPhone 6, but it delayed the formation and growth of that company by over a year. We had to bring in new founders without immigration problems.

Who knows what could have happened in that year? And I’m sure our former student is contributing economic value working for Apple, but nothing like what he could be doing in a startup.

John Doerr, one of the most successful venture capitalists in history, said “I would staple a green card to the diploma of anyone that graduates with an advanced degree in the physical sciences or engineering in the United States.” He’s absolutely right.

These people are going to create value. Create jobs. Pay taxes, for crying out loud! Why would we NOT want them to stay here? Get married, raise families, buy a house, buy 2.3 cars… the multipliers are endless.

Now, what I always hear when I speak on this subject is that “immigrants take jobs from Americans.” The Mayor already addressed this. That’s just not true for entrepreneurial immigrants! They don’t TAKE jobs, they MAKE jobs!

First for themselves, then for co-founders, and eventually—if successful—for hundreds, or, thousands of employees.

This is NOT a zero-sum game. If these immigrants aren’t allowed to create jobs, those jobs WILL NOT go to native-born Americans… those jobs simply won’t exist.

And these aren’t jobs flipping burgers or picking crops. These are high-quality high-paying jobs that your kids would like to have someday. Example: There are two million “Internet jobs” in the United States. None of those jobs existed twenty years ago. Most of the COMPANIES didn’t exist twenty years ago. Now, subtract all of those Silicon Valley companies who were founded by immigrants. It’s a pretty ugly picture.

And although Silicon Valley gets all the press, it’s deeper than that. As a bit of history, not just Google and Intel, but Pfizer, DuPont, U.S. Steel, and Procter & Gamble were once startups founded by immigrants.

Earlier, Alejandro repeated the cliché that “we are a nation of immigrants.” It’s a cliché, but it’s also true. We still have the world’s best graduate schools; other countries are catching up, but we started from far ahead.

Moreover… We have a history of risk-taking, of capital fluidity, and of tolerance of failure that has made the U.S. the best place in the world to start a company. Other countries are catching up here, too, but our culture and history give us an edge. Even with our current financial troubles, I believe that we’re still the entrepreneurial Mecca for the world.

But we have to make sure that we attract the best, brightest, and most innovative entrepreneurs, whether they were born here or not.

In honor of the Mayor, i made up a baseball analogy, but he beat me to it. Building fences to keep out brainpower is like saying that “My baseball team has enough talent, let the other teams get some good players, too.” That’s not how the Yankees play the game, and it’s not how the United States should play the game.

With that, I’ll pass the microphone and look forward to the rest of the panel. Thank you.

 

Ironically, with his fat pasty skin and obsolete tech skills (his words), this douche would be a HUGE mark for any Indian slumdog scab, and would be forced train his curry-scented replacement immediately, that is, IF HE HAD A REAL FUCKIN' JOB.

BUT NO, he feeds at the trough of public dollars, promoting imported students and denigrinating the "dumbass crackers" (his words) from America that manage to work their way into places like Georgia Tech.  And speaking of Hitler, Indian students LOVE HITLER.

FUCK YOU STEPHEN FLEMING.

Sorry for the outburst, but for this douche collaborator, there can only be four words:

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION

 


tunnel rat posted on September 27, 2011 16:06
From our friends at meetyourindianreplacement.com



- Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies

Slumdog Comment Generator

Clueless?
Not Sure How To Respond?
Use the Slumdog Comment Generator!

Calendar

«  October 2014  »
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
293012345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
272829303112
3456789
View posts in large calendar

Month List

Disclaimer
The thoughts expressed on this blog may or may not be the author's own and are protected by the 1st Amendment. Any attempt to reveal his identity by contacting a slumdog hack at Google, or a corrupt Desi sys-admin at his ISP will be dealt with promptly and severely. Civil and criminal penalties may apply if one is found to have used private information in an attempt to get the author fired at the Hindu-only I.T. ghetto he currently works at. In addition, any Desi who attempts to burn the author's house down because they are enraged over his writing will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. This isn't India.

© Copyright 2014 Life of an I.T. Grunt


View My Stats