Tunnel Rat posted on October 28, 2012 02:07

Robert X. Cringlely has been covering IT for decades and has been critical of Indian Bowel Movement's (IBM) labor practices and ethnic cleansing of American techies.  Here he destroys many of the myths regarding the slumdog scabs and their (ab)use by the high-tech junta:

The H-1B visa program was created in 1990 to allow companies to bring skilled technical workers into the USA. It’s a non-immigrant visa and so has nothing at all to do with staying in the country, becoming a citizen, or starting a business. Big tech employers are constantly lobbying for increases in H-1B quotas citing their inability to find qualified US job applicants. Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates and other leaders from the IT industry have testified about this before Congress. Both major political parties embrace the H-1B program with varying levels of enthusiasm.

But Bill Gates is wrong. What he said to Congress may have been right for Microsoft but was wrong for America and can only lead to lower wages, lower employment, and a lower standard of living. This is a bigger deal than people understand: it’s the rebirth of industrial labor relations circa 1920. Our ignorance about the H-1B visa program is being used to unfairly limit wages and steal -- yes, steal -- jobs from US citizens...

http://betanews.com/2012/10/25/h-1b-visa-abuse-limits-wages-and-steals-us-jobs/

This article also his getting traction at Slashdot, and the many comments are revealing.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


Tunnel Rat posted on May 25, 2012 22:50
I urge all American techies to call the number at the end of this article and report any slumdogs, collaborators, or Desi managers that are in engaged in the ethnic cleansing of American IT workers:

The Justice Department filed a lawsuit today against Whiz International LLC, an information technology staffing company in Jersey City, N.J., regarding allegations that the company violated the anti-discrimination provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) when it terminated an employee in retaliation for expressing opposition to Whiz’s alleged preference for foreign nationals with temporary work visas.

The complaint alleges that the company directed an employee that served as a receptionist and a recruiter, to prefer certain noncitizens in its recruitment efforts and then terminated the employee when she expressed discomfort with excluding U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents from consideration. The anti-discrimination provision prohibits employers from retaliating against workers who oppose a practice that is illegal under the statute or who attempt to assert rights under the statute.
 
“Employers cannot punish employees who try to do the right thing and take reasonable measures to shed light on a practice they believe may be discriminatory,” said Thomas E. Perez, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division. “Employers must ensure that their practices conform to the anti-discrimination provision of the INA, and retaliation will not be tolerated.”

The complaint seeks a court order prohibiting future discrimination by the respondent, monetary damages to the employee, as well as civil penalties. 
 
The Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC) is responsible for enforcing the anti-discrimination provisions of the INA, which protect U.S. citizens and certain work-authorized individuals from citizenship status discrimination.  The INA also protects work-authorized individuals from national origin discrimination, over-documentation in the employment eligibility verification process and retaliation.


For more information about protections against employment discrimination under the immigration laws, call 1-800-255-7688 (OSC’s worker hotline) (1-800-237-2525, TDD for hearing impaired), 1-800-255-8155 (OSC’s employer hotline) (1-800-362-2735, TDD for hearing impaired), sign up for a no-cost webinar at  www.justice.gov/crt/about/osc/webinars.php, email osccrt@usdoj.gov, or visit the website at www.justice.gov/crt/about/osc/. Civil Rights Division Trial Attorney Liza Zamd represents the department in this matter.


I made this video about two years ago and it was taken down off of YouTube, first because of copyright issues by the original movie company, and most recently by a court order issued by a delusional New Jersey judge (is there any kind) that was bribed by Apex Technology Group boss Sarvesh Kumar Dharayan and his mob lawyer, Patrick Papalia. Enjoy!

Apex Technology Group from Rudy Torrent on Vimeo.


tunnel rat posted on December 28, 2011 10:11

Yet another in a series of numerous lawsuits targeting the slumdog slave trade, one of which (not this one) I am currently a plaintiff in:

     DALLAS (CN) - A federal class action alleging forced labor, human trafficking and RICO violations claims a financial services tech company uses bait-and-switch tactics to lure foreign workers, whom it defrauds and underpays in violation of their employment agreements and of visa rules.
     Lead plaintiff Venkata Sudhakar Amerineni sued Maruthi Technologies dba Anblicks, three Maruthi officers, and Gavs Information Services dba Gavs Technologies.
     Maruthi's home page on the Internet claim it offers "innovative solutions for moving forward and navigat[ing] the road to recovery for financial sector."
     The class claims Maruthi uses bait-and-switch tactics to recruit foreign workers, then does not pay the full, legally required prevailing wages to workers with H-1B visas.
     Defendant Vamsi Kadiyala is described as a U.S. citizen and resident of India, who travels to the United States to do business for Maruthi and himself.
     "At all material times, Vamsi Kadiyala has been an owner of Maruthi. Vamsi Kadiyala was responsible for directing fraudulent operations and making false representations and attestations on behalf of Maruthi with regard to H-1B workers, including representations made regarding the plaintiff's H-1B visa application," the complaint states.
     Defendant Padmaja Kadiyala also is described as a U.S. citizen who lives in India and travels to the United States for business. She is accused of being "responsible for directing fraudulent operations and making false representations and attestations on behalf of Maruthi with regard to H-1B workers as discussed herein, including representations made regarding the plaintiff's H-1B visa application."
     Defendant Kumar Tirumal, of Irving, Texas, "has been the operations director of Maruthi," the complaint states. "Tirumal was responsible for directing fraudulent operations and making false representations and attestations on behalf of Maruthi with regard to H-1B workers as discussed herein."
     According to the complaint: "The Immigration and Nationality Act ('INA') limits the types of foreign workers eligible for H-1B visas, and imposes prevailing wage requirements on H-1B sponsor employers in order to protect American workers. "These wage requirements include that sponsor employers are required to pay their H-1B employees the higher of (a) actual wages the employer pays co-workers in related positions or (b) a 'prevailing wage' for the specialty, as determined by an independent survey of wages paid to workers similarly employed in the geographic area of intended employment. Sponsor employers are further required to provide prevailing wages to H-1B employees during the periods that they are in nonproductive status (commonly called 'benched' status): that is, when the H-1B worker is not performing work due to a decision by the employer, e.g., because of lack of assigned work. ... These wage requirements are designed to both prevent exploitation of foreign workers and to avoid the influx of cheap foreign labor for professional services."
     Amerineni claims Maruthi promised him $63,000 a year, but when he arrived, told him there was no work available and that he would not be paid for nonproductive time.
     "Maruthi requires these H-1B employees to obtain third-party consulting work and steer income from that work to Maruthi before these individuals are paid any wages," the complaint states.
     "In addition to unpaid 'benched' periods at the start of their employment relationship with Maruthi, those employees who do eventually find third-party consulting work often experience gap periods between consulting projects. These Maruthi H-1B employees are not paid the required prevailing wage, or any wages, during these gap periods of nonproductive/benched time.
     "Maruthi H-1B employees who do find paying project work continue to be underpaid by defendants, and receive less than the required prevailing wage or the wage promised by Maruthi," according to the complaint.
     Gavs is accused of participating in the scheme by arranging third-party work for Maruthi's H-1B workers.
     The class consists of all H-1B workers employed by Maruthi in the past 4 years who have been paid less than the full prevailing wage. It seeks damages for RICO violations, forced labor and human trafficking, and breach of contract.
     It is represented by Michael Brown with Peterson, Berk & Cross in Appleton, Wisc. 


tunnel rat posted on October 27, 2011 01:36

This Devil Dog came home from Iraq, to an economy ravaged by the Slumdog Slave Trade, the High-Tech Junta, and the Globalist shills, and got his skull shattered.  From what I hear, he is a Systems Analyst, probably making a fraction of what he deserves because of the flood of the low-wage scabs in his field.

FUCK YOU SLUMDOG PARISITES THAT HAVE RAVAGED OUR COUNTRY.

 

http://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/5966/p/salsa/web/common/public/content?content_item_KEY=9491


tunnel rat posted on September 27, 2011 16:06
From our friends at meetyourindianreplacement.com


tunnel rat posted on June 4, 2011 13:04

Back 2009, I reported on how a Desi bodyshop ripped off New York City to the tune of $15 million, and now there is news of yet another dry anal rape of NYC taxpayers at the hands of more slumdog slave traders:

June 1, 2011, 2:41 pm

Company Tied to Payroll Project Shuts Down

WAYNE, N.J. — A New Jersey technology company that had been a major contractor on the Bloomberg administration’s troubled CityTime payroll project abruptly halted operations and terminated its employees amid a widening city and federal investigation, according to a company memorandum sent out this week.

The top two executives of the company, TechnoDyne L.L.C., have returned to their native India, according to people familiar with the case who were not authorized to speak publicly because the investigation was continuing.

Whether the executives — Reddy and Padma Allen, American citizens who are husband and wife — will return is unclear. They are alluded to but not identified by name as co-conspirators in a federal complaint that was made public on Friday; neither they nor their company has been charged...

So these maderchads got busted, packed their shit and went back to that 3rd-world sewer called India?  WTF?  Why can't this happen to every slumdog slave trader?

But wait, it gets even more interesting...

...The company, which investigators said relied on Science Applications International for 80 percent of its revenue, pledged to cooperate with immigration lawyers to help workers who have H-1B visas or green cards. The company also said it would keep employees updated on compensation, health insurance and other issues.

A spokeswoman for the company did not respond to phone calls and e-mails to her. Meanwhile, a visit to the company’s two addresses here on Wednesday — one in an office park, the other at a U.P.S. store — did not reveal any activity or presence, other than the company’s name tacked onto a building directory. One person who works in the office park said few people had shown up to TechnoDyne’s office in recent months.

TechnoDyne billed itself as an information technology consulting company that helped governments and private businesses with software development and cloud-computing management...

OMG!  You mean they used low-wage, low-skill slumdogs? 

WELL GUESS WHAT, SLUMDOGS.  YOU HAVE THIRTY DAYS TO PACK YOUR SHIT AND GO HOME!

I've already contacted my friends at the N.J. Department of Labor to make sure that they keep an eye out on you scabs, and they will make sure that you are deported ASAP.

In the meantime, Insurgents can target the fat fuck collaborator who enabled this rape of NYC taxpayers, Gerard Denault:

He is out on bail and can easily be tracked down. 

Happy hunting.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION

 

 


Every week, we get more stories of the federal crackdown on the Desi bodyshop business.  What is important about the latest bust in Iowa is this nugget buried in the original story:

The Associated Press is reporting that the two men appear to be included in a national crackdown into suspected immigration fraud.

Hours after their arrest, the U.S. attorneys office announced it would hold a news conference today detailing “a nationwide coordinated enforcement action targeting visa fraud.” Officials wouldn’t immediately release other details.


That's right, slumdogs and Desi pimps, the FEDS ARE COMING AFTER YOU.  I told you that THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION:

 

2 men to be sentenced in work visa fraud case

2 men who ran software firm in Clinton to be sentenced on visa fraud conspiracy charges

DAVENPORT, Iowa (AP) -- Two men, who ran a software company in Clinton, Iowa, are expected to be sentenced on charges they committed visa fraud to bring foreign workers to the U.S.

Fazal Mehmood and Viheet Maheshwari have pleaded guilty to a conspiracy to make false statements and commit visa fraud in connection with several applications to bring foreign workers to the U.S. under H-1B Visas.

Mehmood and Maheshwari ran companies called Worldwide Software Services and Sana Systems.

Federal prosecutors say they applied for H-1B Visas for foreign workers that contained false statements about their jobs and work locations. For instance, they told the government that employees would be working as programmers and analysts, but those jobs did not exist after they arrived in the U.S.

Sentencing is Wednesday at the federal courthouse in Davenport.


After over 10 years, I cancelled my Wall Street Journal subscription recently because I was sick of their pro-H-1B editorials.  Now it seems that the tide is turning and they are reporting the truth as opposed to NASSCOM propaganda.  What was a blurb in the WSJ India section is now front page news, news that the Insurgency has been proclaiming for years.  The myth of the "best and the brightest" has now been debunked and the world is now aware of the fraud known as the slumdog techie, or even the slumdog college graduate.  The tales of cheating, bogus degrees, and absurd incompentence demonstrated by the hordes of curry-scented scabs is writ large in this piece:

 

  • The Wall Street Journal

Many recent engineering grads in India say that after months of job hunting they are still unemployed and lack the skills necessary to join the workforce. Critics say corruption and low standards are to blame. Poh Si Teng reports from New Delhi.

BANGALORE, India—Call-center company 24/7 Customer Pvt. Ltd. is desperate to find new recruits who can answer questions by phone and email. It wants to hire 3,000 people this year. Yet in this country of 1.2 billion people, that is beginning to look like an impossible goal.

So few of the high school and college graduates who come through the door can communicate effectively in English, and so many lack a grasp of educational basics such as reading comprehension, that the company can hire just three out of every 100 applicants.

Flawed Miracle

The Journal is examining the threats to, and limits of, India's economic ascent.

India projects an image of a nation churning out hundreds of thousands of students every year who are well educated, a looming threat to the better-paid middle-class workers of the West. Their abilities in math have been cited by President Barack Obama as a reason why the U.S. is facing competitive challenges.

Yet 24/7 Customer's experience tells a very different story. Its increasing difficulty finding competent employees in India has forced the company to expand its search to the Philippines and Nicaragua. Most of its 8,000 employees are now based outside of India.

In the nation that made offshoring a household word, 24/7 finds itself so short of talent that it is having to offshore.

"With India's population size, it should be so much easier to find employees," says S. Nagarajan, founder of the company. "Instead, we're scouring every nook and cranny."

India's economic expansion was supposed to create opportunities for millions to rise out of poverty, get an education and land good jobs. But as India liberalized its economy starting in 1991 after decades of socialism, it failed to reform its heavily regulated education system.


Business executives say schools are hampered by overbearing bureaucracy and a focus on rote learning rather than critical thinking and comprehension. Government keeps tuition low, which makes schools accessible to more students, but also keeps teacher salaries and budgets low. What's more, say educators and business leaders, the curriculum in most places is outdated and disconnected from the real world.

"If you pay peanuts, you get monkeys," says Vijay Thadani, chief executive of New Delhi-based NIIT Ltd. India, a recruitment firm that also runs job-training programs for college graduates lacking the skills to land good jobs. [THAT IS WHAT I'VE BEEN SAYING ABOUT SLUMDOG H-1Bs FOR YEARS]

Muddying the picture is that on the surface, India appears to have met the demand for more educated workers with a quantum leap in graduates. Engineering colleges in India now have seats for 1.5 million students, nearly four times the 390,000 available in 2000, according to the National Association of Software and Services Companies, a trade group.

But 75% of technical graduates and more than 85% of general graduates are unemployable by India's high-growth global industries, including information technology and call centers, according to results from assessment tests administered by the group.[YEAH, NO SHIT]

Another survey, conducted annually by Pratham, a nongovernmental organization that aims to improve education for the poor, looked at grade-school performance at 13,000 schools across India. It found that about half of the country's fifth graders can't read at a second-grade level.

At stake is India's ability to sustain growth—its economy is projected to expand 9% this year—while maintaining its advantages as a low-cost place to do business.

The challenge is especially pressing given the country's more youthful population than the U.S., Europe and China. More than half of India's population is under the age of 25, and one million people a month are expected to seek to join the labor force here over the next decade, the Indian government estimates. The fear is that if these young people aren't trained well enough to participate in the country's glittering new economy, they pose a potential threat to India's stability.

"Economic reforms are not about goofy rich guys buying Mercedes cars," says Manish Sabharwal, managing director of Teamlease Services Ltd., an employee recruitment and training firm in Bangalore. "Twenty years of reforms are worth nothing if we can't get our kids into jobs."

[EDUCATE]

Yet even as the government and business leaders acknowledge the labor shortage, educational reforms are a long way from becoming law. A bill that gives schools more autonomy to design their own curriculum, for example, is expected to be introduced in the cabinet in the next few weeks, and in parliament later this year.

"I was not prepared at all to get a job," says Pradeep Singh, 23, who graduated last year from RKDF College of Engineering, one of the city of Bhopal's oldest engineering schools. He has been on five job interviews—none of which led to work. To make himself more attractive to potential employers, he has enrolled in a five-month-long computer programming course run by NIIT.

Mr. Singh and several other engineering graduates said they learned quickly that they needn't bother to go to some classes. "The faculty take it very casually, and the students take it very casually, like they've all agreed not to be bothered too much," Mr. Singh says. He says he routinely missed a couple of days of classes a week, and it took just three or four days of cramming from the textbook at the end of the semester to pass the exams.

Others said cheating, often in collaboration with test graders, is rampant. Deepak Sharma, 26, failed several exams when he was enrolled at a top engineering college outside of Delhi, until he finally figured out the trick: Writing his mobile number on the exam paper.

That's what he did for a theory-of-computation exam, and shortly after, he says the examiner called him and offered to pass him and his friends if they paid 10,000 rupees each, about $250. He and four friends pulled together the money, and they all passed the test.

"I feel almost 99% certain that if I didn't pay the money, I would have failed the exam again," says Mr. Sharma.

BC Nakra, Pro Vice Chancellor of ITM University, where Mr. Sharma studied, said in an interview that there is no cheating at his school, and that if anyone were spotted cheating in this way, he would be "behind bars." He said he had read about a case or two in the newspaper, and in the "rarest of the rare cases, it might happen somewhere, and if you blow [it] out of all proportions, it effects the entire community." The examiner couldn't be located for comment.

Cheating aside, the Indian education system needs to change its entire orientation to focus on learning, says Saurabh Govil, senior vice president in human resources at Wipro Technologies. Wipro, India's third largest software exporter by sales, says it has struggled to find skilled workers. The problem, says Mr. Govil, is immense: "How are you able to change the mind-set that knowledge is more than a stamp?"

At 24/7 Customer's recruiting center on a recent afternoon, 40 people were filling out forms in an interior lobby filled with bucket seats. In a glass-walled conference room, a human-resources executive interviewed a group of seven applicants. Six were recent college graduates, and one said he was enrolled in a correspondence degree program.

One by one, they delivered biographical monologues in halting English. [THAT IS WHAT THE INSURGENTS CALL HINGLISH] The interviewer interrupted one young man who spoke so fast, it was hard to tell what he was saying. The young man was instructed to compose himself and start from the beginning. He tried again, speaking just as fast, and was rejected after the first round.

Another applicant, Rajan Kumar, said he earned a bachelor's degree in engineering a couple of years ago. His hobby is watching cricket, he said, and his strength is punctuality [AND TROLLING FOR YOUNG GIRLS ON THE INTERNET, LIKE THIS SLUMDOG]. The interviewer, noting his engineering degree, asked why he isn't trying to get a job in a technical field, to which he replied: "Right now, I'm here." This explanation was judged inadequate, and Mr. Kumar was eliminated, too.

A 22-year-old man named Chaudhury Laxmikant Dash, who graduated last year, also with a bachelor's in engineering, said he's a game-show winner whose hobby is international travel. But when probed by the interviewer, he conceded, "Until now I have not traveled." Still, he made it through the first-round interview, along with two others, a woman and a man who filled out his application with just one name, Robinson.

For their next challenge, they had to type 25 words a minute. The woman typed a page only to learn her pace was too slow at 18 words a minute. Mr. Dash, sweating and hunched over, couldn't get his score high enough, despite two attempts.[YOU SHOULD SEE THEM TRY TO WRITE FUCKIN' CODE -- TALK ABOUT HUNT AND PECK!]

Only Mr. Robinson moved on to the third part of the test, featuring a single paragraph about nuclear war followed by three multiple-choice questions. Mr. Robinson stared at the screen, immobilized. [ANOTHER DAY AT THE OFFICE FOR MOST SLUMDOG H-1Bs] With his failure to pass the comprehension section, the last of the original group of applicants was eliminated.

The average graduate's "ability to comprehend and converse is very low," says Satya Sai Sylada, 24/7 Customer's head of hiring for India. "That's the biggest challenge we face." [THAT IS WHY I CALL THEM MARBLE-MOUTHED RETARDS]

Indeed, demand for skilled labor continues to grow. Tata Consultancy Services, part of the Tata Group, expects to hire 65,000 people this year, up from 38,000 last year and 700 in 1986.

Trying to bridge the widening chasm between job requirements and the skills of graduates, Tata has extended its internal training program. It puts fresh graduates through 72 days of training, double the duration in 1986, says Tata chief executive N. Chandrasekaran. Tata has a special campus in south India where it trains 9,000 recruits at a time, and has plans to bump that up to 10,000.

Wipro runs an even longer, 90-day training program [AND A CRIMINAL OPERATION] to address what Mr. Govil, the human-resources executive, calls the "inherent inadequacies" in Indian engineering education. The company can train 5,000 employees at once.

Both companies sent teams of employees to India's approximately 3,000 engineering colleges to assess the quality of each before they decided where to focus their campus recruiting efforts. Tata says 300 of the schools made the cut; for Wipro, only 100 did.

Tata has also begun recruiting and training liberal-arts students with no engineering background but who want secure jobs. And Wipro has set up a foundation that spends $4 million annually to train teachers. Participants attend week-long workshops and then get follow-up online mentoring. Some say that where they used to spend a third of class time with their backs to students, drawing diagrams on the blackboard, they now engage students in discussion and use audiovisual props.


Job applicants at 24/7, which says only three of 100 are qualified.

"Before, I didn't take the students into consideration," says Vishal Nitnaware, a senior lecturer in mechanical engineering at SVPM College of Engineering in rural Maharashtra state. Now, he says, he tries to engage them, so they're less nervous to speak up and participate in discussions.

This kind of teaching might have helped D.H. Shivanand, 25, the son of farmers from a village outside of Bangalore. He just finished a master's degree in business administration—in English—from one of Bangalore's top colleges. His father borrowed the $4,500 tuition from a small lending agency. Now, almost a year after graduating, Mr. Shivanand is still looking for an entry-level finance job. [I HAD THREE BASTARDS LIKE THIS WITH INDIAN DEGREES TRY TO SNEAK INTO MY CORPORATION RECENTLY AND I SHITCANNED THEM IN THE OPENING INTERVIEW]

Tata and IBM Corp., among dozens of other firms, turned him down, he says, after he repeatedly failed to answer questions correctly in the job interviews. He says he actually knew the answers but froze because he got nervous, so he's now taking a course to improve his confidence, interviewing skills and spoken English. His family is again pitching in, paying 6,000 rupees a month for his rent, or about $130, plus 1,500 rupees for the course, or $33.

"My family has invested so much money in my education, and they don't understand why I am still not finding a job," says Mr. Shivanand. "They are hoping very, very much that I get a job soon, so after all of their investment, I will finally support them."

—Poh Si Teng and Arlene Chang contributed to this article.

Write to Geeta Anand at geeta.anand@wsj.com


tunnel rat posted on March 30, 2011 00:32

For those of you H-1Bs who are thinking about starting your own Desi bodyshop, I suggest you think twice before importing your culture of corruption to our shores.  Once again, Patrick Thibodeau (who NASSCOM agent Vivek Whadhwa once called an anti-H-1B shill) is doing great work   I guess this is what Vivek Wadhwa was talking about when he wrote about all the companies these slumdogs "create":

Counterfeit H-1B job offers nets six months in jail

Businessman admits submitting H-1B applications with counterfeit job offer letters from Gap, Wells Fargo and Genentech

By Patrick Thibodeau
March 29, 2011 11:40 AM ET

Computerworld - A California businessman last week was sentenced to six months in prison for trying to get H-1B visas for workers to fill jobs that did not exist, said the U.S. Department of Justice.

Srinivasa Chennupati, 33, pled guilty in December to visa fraud charges in a case heard in U.S. District Court in Oakland. The sentence also includes three years of supervised release.

Chennupati admitted that starting on April 1, 2009, he submitted 11 foreign worker petitions to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that contained "counterfeit job offer letters" from the Gap Corporation, Wells Fargo Bank and Genentech, the Justice Dept. said in a statement.

The jobs listed in the petitions were for computer systems analysts and software engineers that would be paid between $60,000 and $65,000, according to court records.

The USCIS begins accepting H-1B petitions on April 1 for the next federal fiscal year that begins on Oct. 1.

Chennupati, a native of India, came to the U.S. in 2001 on a work visa and has worked legally in the U.S. since then, according to court records. He has a wife and two children, the records said.

...

 



- Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies

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