It is about time...

 

Tech worker groups boycott IBM, Infosys, Manpower

Advocacy groups say the companies should look first for U.S. tech workers for U.S. IT jobs

Grant Gross
 
 

June 2, 2014 (IDG News Service)

Three U.S. tech worker groups have launched a labor boycott of IBM, Infosys and Manpower, saying the companies have engaged in a pattern that discourages U.S. workers from applying for U.S. IT jobs by tailoring employment ads toward overseas workers.

The companies should look first for U.S. workers to fill U.S. IT jobs, said representatives of Bright Future Jobs, the Programmers Guild and WashTech.

With the boycott, the three groups want to raise awareness of discriminatory hiring practices and put pressure on the three companies to consider U.S. IT workers for U.S. jobs, said Donna Conroy, director of Bright Future Jobs.

The main goals of the boycott are "attention getting" and putting pressure on the IT staffing firms to change their practices, Conroy said. With IT staffing agencies competing to fill U.S. positions, the companies contracting for their services may want to consider if the staffing firm "has a good reputation," she said.

The boycott should also raise concerns about staffing firms violating equal employment laws, said Les French, president of WashTech. "In addition to calling attention to an illegal practice, we want to show there are valid challenges to the 'labor shortage' of STEM workers," French said in an email.

An Infosys spokeswoman disputed the charges that it avoids recruiting U.S. IT workers.

"It is incorrect to allude that we exclude or discourage U.S. workers," she said by email. "Today, we are recruiting for over 440 active openings across 20 states in the U.S."

Many of the positions target people who have a U.S. master's degree in business administration for sales and management consultant jobs, she said. "The graduate hiring program is a key investment to strengthen our future leadership pool," she added. "Attracting the best and brightest talent is paramount to Infosys success."

The company's external job posts give "everyone an equal opportunity to apply," she added. The company supports several minority advocacy groups, she said.

Representatives from IBM and Manpower didn't respond to requests for comment on the boycott.

In some cases, a Manpower subsidiary has advertised for Indian IT workers to come to the U.S. for openings anticipated more than a year in advance, said Conroy, author of a white paper, released last week, that is focused on Manpower's IT recruitment efforts in India.

The advertisements in India are being placed even though "most Americans believe the nature of the tech industry is so fast-paced that staffing projections cannot be adequately foreseen," she said.

Meanwhile, Manpower is not advertising for U.S. IT positions on U.S. job portals, Conroy said. But if Manpower advertised in the U.S. using the same lead time it is using in India, it would give companies "plenty of time to seek Americans first."

In November 2013, Manpower subsidiary Experis IT India advertised in India for an OpenStack engineer for a U.S. position, Bright Future Jobs noted. "We are now hiring young, dynamic, skilled and experienced IT professionals from India to work with us in the U.S.," the ad said.

Other Experis IT India ads in late 2013 talked about the company filling out H-1B worker visa applications for job applicants, with one ad saying "all expenses related to your visa filing would be take care of" by Manpower.

The three tech workers groups also plan to launch an educational effort aimed at helping U.S. tech workers recognize discriminatory job ads and questions during job interviews, Conroy said. "When people are educated, there will likely be more lawsuits" related to discriminatory employment practices, she said.

Rajiv Dabhadkar, the founder of the National Organization for Software and Technology Professionals, a national tech advocacy organization in India, said he supports the boycott.

Indian employers show a "strong preference" for Indian IT workers, Dabhadkar said. He questioned why U.S. companies don't do the same thing.

The boycott "will protect the Indian foreign workers from the accusation of displacing Americans," he said. "Indians were not put on this earth to displace Americans, but Manpower's recruiting efforts show this is their plan."

Segregated recruiting opens the door to "unscrupulous agents" who make false promises to Indian IT workers, he added.

"The brokerage of intellectual capital drives down wages, and foreign workers are under paid," Dabhadkar said by email. "Multiple layers of broker agencies, that earn a per hour commission of their visa-sponsored employee creates a grey market."

Importing foreign workers to the U.S. as a commodity violates human rights, he added. "American employers gain competitive advantage and profitability by labor arbitrage, by paying low to their sponsored workers, and bidding high to their clients," Dabhadkar said.

Grant Gross covers technology and telecom policy in the U.S. government for The IDG News Service. Follow Grant on Twitter at GrantGross. Grant's email address is grant_gross@idg.com.


It is now official, now that the Wall Street Journal has stopped being the cheerleaders for more H-1Bs.  And it is also amazing that the "Indian outsourcing giants" can call this bill discriminatory when they refuse hire Americans to staff consulting gigs in the US, and instead turn every fucking project they take over it a nepotistic curry den:

A fight is brewing between Washington and New Delhi over provisions in the U.S.'s draft immigration bill that could hobble Indian outsourcing firms' businesses in the U.S.

The proposals, which include cutting back sharply on the number of foreign workers these outsourcing companies can send to their U.S. offices, have won broad support from rival U.S. technology firms, including International Business Machines Corp. IBM +0.05% and Accenture ACN +1.98% PLC, lobbyists say.

India's $110 billion IT industry, which performs back-office tasks such as software programming, makes about half its revenue from the U.S.

Indian companies such as Infosys Ltd., 500209.BY -0.84% Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. 532540.BY -1.16% and Wipro Ltd. 507685.BY -0.82% have set up large U.S. offices to be closer to clients, staffing the sites overwhelmingly with Indian expatriates, who earn significantly less than their American counterparts.

The model has been challenged in recent years by U.S. politicians, who argue Indian outsourcing companies are misusing the program to undercut local technology-sector workers.

Now, big U.S. tech companies, which want to hire more foreign workers but can't because of competition with Indian firms for available visas, have joined the fray.

U.S. tech firms successfully lobbied for the draft immigration bill to include caps on the number of foreign workers a U.S.-based company can employ on skilled-worker visas, according to lobbyists working for U.S. firms and another representing Indian outsourcers.

The bill doesn't name countries. But Indian outsourcing giants sponsor more than half the 65,000 skilled-worker permits, known as H1-B visas, that the U.S. issues annually to workers with at least a bachelor's degree.

Many of these firms have as much as 80% of their staff in the U.S. on H1-B and other visas. The draft legislation, which is being debated in the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, would prohibit companies with more than 75% of their employees in the U.S. on such visas from bringing in additional workers. That figure would fall to 65% within a year, and in the years after that the limit would be 50%.

IBM and Accenture declined to comment.

The U.S. firms are seeking to hire more foreign workers for high-skilled jobs but face a visa shortage because of competition with Indian firms.

Earlier this month, U.S.-based employers exhausted the annual 65,000-person quota for H1-B visas within days of the opening of applications, a sign of the strengthening domestic economy.

The immigration bill also seeks to raise the yearly cap on H1-B visas to 180,000. The cap on foreign workers means U.S. companies could benefit, while Indian firms would have to hire more U.S. employees.

Firms that don't comply will be barred from sending consultants to work in clients' offices, a business that accounts for roughly 50% of Indian companies' revenue in the U.S.

The foreign-worker caps were designed to get political backing to increase the number of available H1-B visas, people familiar with the negotiations said, and U.S. firms were concerned that a broader curb on visas would reduce their ability to hire more from overseas amid a dearth of U.S. computer graduates

Som Mittal, president of the National Association of Software and Services Companies, an India IT trade body, warned the bill was "discriminatory" and might ignite a trade war. The association estimates the regulations could wipe out a quarter of the Indian IT sector's global revenue.

Indian Finance Minister P. Chidambaram raised concerns about the bill with U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew during a meeting last week in Washington. He told Mr. Lew the issue of short-term work visas shouldn't be mixed up with immigration, according to an account of the meeting Mr. Chidambaram gave to Indian media.

Commercial relations between the nations are already tense because of recent Indian regulations that would impose a sweeping "Buy India" mandate, requiring that large portions of high-tech products purchased by the government be manufactured locally. U.S. and other foreign companies are lobbying against the rules, saying they conflict with free-trade norms. Other areas of contention include India's efforts to increase its tax haul, which overseas companies complain has caused confusion for investors.

India argues the provisions are needed to curb technology imports from the U.S. and spur domestic manufacturing.

Indian companies claim the U.S.'s latest proposals to restrict visas could also amount to restrictions on free trade.

But many U.S. members of Congress contend India is misusing the H-1B system to bring in fairly low-skilled employees, denying those places to higher-skilled workers that U.S. firms want to hire.

On Monday, at a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss the immigration bill, Brad Smith, Microsoft Corp.'s MSFT +3.79% chief counsel, said the company couldn't get enough visas for high-skilled jobs that it can't fill through hiring in the U.S.

"We are not able to fill all the jobs that we are creating," Mr. Smith said in testimony. He told the committee that Indian outsourcing firms must "evolve their business models" by hiring more Americans.

Microsoft and IBM have recently expanded their presence in India, where they have hired thousands of local employees.

Sen. Richard Durbin (D., Ill.) said in response that the situation was an abuse of the visa regime. "Most people would think, well, Microsoft needs these folks," he said. "And they'd be shocked to know that most of the H-1B visas are not going to companies like yours. They're going to these outsourcing companies."

Indian firms say that over the past three years, in anticipation of the visa changes, they began hiring U.S. employees at a faster rate than new foreign workers.

Nasscom, the association of Indian IT firms, said the efforts faced roadblocks because of a lack of qualified U.S. graduates.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2013, the U.S. economy will create approximately 120,000 new jobs for people with degrees in computer science.

In his testimony before the Senate committee, Mr. Smith of Microsoft said that, by his own company's calculations, U.S. colleges produce under half that number of graduates annually.

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323551004578441070153741766.html


I have to admit that I was once what you would call a "right-wing wacko" and Paul Krugman was one of my favorite targets.  But like they say, a Democrat is a Republican who hasn't been raped, and a Republican is a Democrat who has not had their job outsourced/off-shored.  I'm have no loyalty to either party, and think both Dems and Republicans are sucking at the tit of the Indian Offshoring Regime and the High-Tech Junta. 

But one cannot argue with Krugman's statement:

Whenever you see some business person quoted complaining about how he or she can’t find workers with the necessary skills, ask what wage they’re offering. Almost always, it turns out that what said business person really wants is highly (and expensively) educated workers at a manual-labor wage. No wonder they come up short.

 

Listen up, you collaborators that like cheap, compliant, foreign scab labor.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


Tunnel Rat posted on October 28, 2012 02:07

Robert X. Cringlely has been covering IT for decades and has been critical of Indian Bowel Movement's (IBM) labor practices and ethnic cleansing of American techies.  Here he destroys many of the myths regarding the slumdog scabs and their (ab)use by the high-tech junta:

The H-1B visa program was created in 1990 to allow companies to bring skilled technical workers into the USA. It’s a non-immigrant visa and so has nothing at all to do with staying in the country, becoming a citizen, or starting a business. Big tech employers are constantly lobbying for increases in H-1B quotas citing their inability to find qualified US job applicants. Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates and other leaders from the IT industry have testified about this before Congress. Both major political parties embrace the H-1B program with varying levels of enthusiasm.

But Bill Gates is wrong. What he said to Congress may have been right for Microsoft but was wrong for America and can only lead to lower wages, lower employment, and a lower standard of living. This is a bigger deal than people understand: it’s the rebirth of industrial labor relations circa 1920. Our ignorance about the H-1B visa program is being used to unfairly limit wages and steal -- yes, steal -- jobs from US citizens...

http://betanews.com/2012/10/25/h-1b-visa-abuse-limits-wages-and-steals-us-jobs/

This article also his getting traction at Slashdot, and the many comments are revealing.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


Uh, no shit.  I bet Andrew Wasser starts getting death threats from the Indian Outsourcing Regime, or a slumdog CMU student throws acid in his face.

IT Outsourcing System Is Broken, How Can Service Providers Fix It?

– Stephanie Overby, CIO

March 29, 2012 

 

Andrew Wasser's perch affords him a broad view of the IT outsourcing industry. Wasser serves as associate dean of the Heinz College's School of Information Systems and Management at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), where a third of the graduate students studying applied business and information technology are refugees from the IT services industry. He has oversight over many of CMU's business projects that are commissioned by a virtual who's who of the outsourcing industry -- providers, clients and consultancies. And, as a veteran financial services CIO and director of CMU's CIO Institute, he has an intimate understanding of the outsourcing practitioner's point of view.

From his multidimensional perspective, one thing is clear: The outsourcing system is broken. Heck, if you go by the old saw that defines insanity as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results, it's downright crazy. The vendors say they are strategic partners, but they are in fact neither strategic nor partners. Both providers and customers say they want to create more business value and innovation, but neither is making the changes necessary to do that.

CIO.com talked to Wasser about what ails the outsourcing industry -- from talent gaps and process devotion to closed-off clients and poor communication -- and what, if anything, could turn things around.

CIO.com: You have a particular interest in the growing talent gap in the global sourcing industry. What is the state of offshore outsourcing recruiting?

Wasser: As important as what we are seeing is why we are seeing it.

My bias is in looking at the big Indian firms -- Infosys, Wipro, Cognizant, TCS -- and to some extent the Accentures, IBMs and captive centers. In the beginning when you talked to a tier-one sourcing [firm], they would tell you, "We get the best of the best." They made offers only to the top 0.5 percent at the universities. And they may still tell you that today, but the reality is quite different.

Because of increased competition and a shortage of talent, they have had to go much deeper into the pool of students and go to second and third-level schools. They are no longer getting the best and the brightest. It's no longer a coup to get an offer from Tata because everyone is getting an offer from Tata.

CIO.com: Is that just a result of needing more people? Are they still recruiting the best and brightest as well -- or is that top talent going elsewhere?

Wasser: These firms have hiring targets -- sometimes as many as 5,000 new employees. They may be getting, at best, the top quartile. I don't have a good handle on where the top decile is going. These young professionals entering the sourcing industry end up "going back to school" at Infosys or Cognizant or Tata, which all have their own academies. They take mechanical or chemical engineers and teach them how to be IT engineers, ideally with some client skills. They repackage them.

CIO.com: What's the biggest complaint you hear from outsourcing customers?

Wasser: We see continued frustration from clients that these people are really good order takers, but they are not problem solvers. They are smart -- no question -- but they are not the strategic partners they had hoped they would be.

CIO.com: Can you trace all of that dissatisfaction back to the recruiting issues at the junior level?

Wasser: I have several hypotheses. One issue is what I call the "filter effect." The sourcing firms go to the same affiliate universities and programs year after year. The HR people have a formulaic set of attributes they are looking for. Did they take discrete math or programming one and two? How were their grades? When they can check off all the boxes, they make an offer.

So they are getting students who have done exactly what they were supposed to do. They graduated from high school with good grades. They told their parents they wanted to study history or art. The parents said, "Great, but you're going to be an engineer." They have no gaps in their studies, no blemishes on their records, their extracurriculars are all in place. And when they finally graduate with a chance to do something innovative or unique, they once again do exactly what mom and dad tells them to do -- apply for a job at IBM or Infosys.

Then the firms say, "Why aren't my people innovating?" Well, you filtered out all the people who might innovate -- the guy who took time off to hike the mountains or the girl who tried to start her own t-shirt company or the student who stumbled freshman year because he was interested in guitars and girls. You hired people who are good at doing what they are told and now you wonder why they're only [a] good order taker.

CIO.com: Couldn't the providers teach them how to approach the work differently?

Wasser: I think so. But that gets to what I call the "treatment effect." Once you get into these sourcing companies, they all follow CMM-I or Six Sigma or ITIL. They put in place all these SLAs and metrics and procedures and policies. I have no problem with process frameworks. They have been great for our industry and turned what was a craft into a science. But they do not foster innovation. No one is willing to say, "Hey this might not meet the SLA or it's not ITIL, but here's a novel way to address a business need."

CIO.com: Are these problems only found in the Indian or offshore-centric firms?

Wasser: No. They are all going after the same talent pool. Some firms tend to be more westernized. I would put Cognizant and Accenture and IBM in that mix. But they've all replicated the Indian delivery model, so they are experiencing the same problems.

One of the issues particular to offshore outsourcing is what I call the "texting effect." Whether you are in China or Mexico or India, the [English] speaking and listening and writing skills aren't always great to begin with. Adding to the problem is that engineers are notoriously weak communicators. And if, on top of that, the engineer doesn't understand the business drivers, they're never going to speak the real language of the client.

CIO.com: Do the customers themselves bear any responsibility for the lack of problem solving in their outsourcing engagements?

Wasser: The client holds a whole lot of responsibility. They often don't want to spend much time with the Indian guy -- they don't think he's that fun, he has an accent, and he can't talk about the Syracuse win last night -- that's a problem.

That is tied up with what I call the "context effect." The client tells the vendor what to do but not why they want it done. If I tell you, "Move this box from here to there," and you do not know the context, all you can do is what I tell you. But if you understand the bigger picture, you may realize you can discard some of what's in those boxes, some of it you can scan, and some you can leave behind. There is so much value in understanding the real meaning of what you are trying to accomplish. Context can be especially difficult to gain when a development center is in Monterrey or Chennai. But it is the client's responsibility to share that business context.

CIO.com: What can outsourcing customers and providers do to advance their relationships and foster the innovation they say they want?

Wasser: Some of it is obvious. Who is doing the hiring? How are they doing it? Where are they doing it? If it's the same old HR mindset, you will get the same old results. Why not take a look at the guy who dropped out of school or the music major?

But even more important is how are you incenting these workers? That is going to require some deprogramming on the client side. You can't focus on the strictest service-level agreements and then wonder why the provider didn't innovate. You didn't create an environment for innovation. You need to explain the why, not just the what.

CIO.com: Many of your master's and Ph.D. students came from the IT outsourcing industry to make the switch from order taker to business innovator. Are they going back into IT services?

Wasser: No. Most stay in the U.S. and go to client firms or consulting firms or technology firms.

I tell them that these talent gaps are an opportunity for them. What you want to be is one of [the] people [who] can fill that gap -- that polymath who can look at things from an entrepreneurial perspective. There will always be someone in Pune or Poland that can program more cheaply than you. But what the world needs is business technologists -- IT professionals who understand negotiation and information security and economics and architecture. We are not going to out-MBA the MBA or out-tech the computer scientist. We are filling the sweet spot in between the two. And that's what companies tell us they need.

http://tinyurl.com/6wpss3g


After over 10 years, I cancelled my Wall Street Journal subscription recently because I was sick of their pro-H-1B editorials.  Now it seems that the tide is turning and they are reporting the truth as opposed to NASSCOM propaganda.  What was a blurb in the WSJ India section is now front page news, news that the Insurgency has been proclaiming for years.  The myth of the "best and the brightest" has now been debunked and the world is now aware of the fraud known as the slumdog techie, or even the slumdog college graduate.  The tales of cheating, bogus degrees, and absurd incompentence demonstrated by the hordes of curry-scented scabs is writ large in this piece:

 

  • The Wall Street Journal

Many recent engineering grads in India say that after months of job hunting they are still unemployed and lack the skills necessary to join the workforce. Critics say corruption and low standards are to blame. Poh Si Teng reports from New Delhi.

BANGALORE, India—Call-center company 24/7 Customer Pvt. Ltd. is desperate to find new recruits who can answer questions by phone and email. It wants to hire 3,000 people this year. Yet in this country of 1.2 billion people, that is beginning to look like an impossible goal.

So few of the high school and college graduates who come through the door can communicate effectively in English, and so many lack a grasp of educational basics such as reading comprehension, that the company can hire just three out of every 100 applicants.

Flawed Miracle

The Journal is examining the threats to, and limits of, India's economic ascent.

India projects an image of a nation churning out hundreds of thousands of students every year who are well educated, a looming threat to the better-paid middle-class workers of the West. Their abilities in math have been cited by President Barack Obama as a reason why the U.S. is facing competitive challenges.

Yet 24/7 Customer's experience tells a very different story. Its increasing difficulty finding competent employees in India has forced the company to expand its search to the Philippines and Nicaragua. Most of its 8,000 employees are now based outside of India.

In the nation that made offshoring a household word, 24/7 finds itself so short of talent that it is having to offshore.

"With India's population size, it should be so much easier to find employees," says S. Nagarajan, founder of the company. "Instead, we're scouring every nook and cranny."

India's economic expansion was supposed to create opportunities for millions to rise out of poverty, get an education and land good jobs. But as India liberalized its economy starting in 1991 after decades of socialism, it failed to reform its heavily regulated education system.


Business executives say schools are hampered by overbearing bureaucracy and a focus on rote learning rather than critical thinking and comprehension. Government keeps tuition low, which makes schools accessible to more students, but also keeps teacher salaries and budgets low. What's more, say educators and business leaders, the curriculum in most places is outdated and disconnected from the real world.

"If you pay peanuts, you get monkeys," says Vijay Thadani, chief executive of New Delhi-based NIIT Ltd. India, a recruitment firm that also runs job-training programs for college graduates lacking the skills to land good jobs. [THAT IS WHAT I'VE BEEN SAYING ABOUT SLUMDOG H-1Bs FOR YEARS]

Muddying the picture is that on the surface, India appears to have met the demand for more educated workers with a quantum leap in graduates. Engineering colleges in India now have seats for 1.5 million students, nearly four times the 390,000 available in 2000, according to the National Association of Software and Services Companies, a trade group.

But 75% of technical graduates and more than 85% of general graduates are unemployable by India's high-growth global industries, including information technology and call centers, according to results from assessment tests administered by the group.[YEAH, NO SHIT]

Another survey, conducted annually by Pratham, a nongovernmental organization that aims to improve education for the poor, looked at grade-school performance at 13,000 schools across India. It found that about half of the country's fifth graders can't read at a second-grade level.

At stake is India's ability to sustain growth—its economy is projected to expand 9% this year—while maintaining its advantages as a low-cost place to do business.

The challenge is especially pressing given the country's more youthful population than the U.S., Europe and China. More than half of India's population is under the age of 25, and one million people a month are expected to seek to join the labor force here over the next decade, the Indian government estimates. The fear is that if these young people aren't trained well enough to participate in the country's glittering new economy, they pose a potential threat to India's stability.

"Economic reforms are not about goofy rich guys buying Mercedes cars," says Manish Sabharwal, managing director of Teamlease Services Ltd., an employee recruitment and training firm in Bangalore. "Twenty years of reforms are worth nothing if we can't get our kids into jobs."

[EDUCATE]

Yet even as the government and business leaders acknowledge the labor shortage, educational reforms are a long way from becoming law. A bill that gives schools more autonomy to design their own curriculum, for example, is expected to be introduced in the cabinet in the next few weeks, and in parliament later this year.

"I was not prepared at all to get a job," says Pradeep Singh, 23, who graduated last year from RKDF College of Engineering, one of the city of Bhopal's oldest engineering schools. He has been on five job interviews—none of which led to work. To make himself more attractive to potential employers, he has enrolled in a five-month-long computer programming course run by NIIT.

Mr. Singh and several other engineering graduates said they learned quickly that they needn't bother to go to some classes. "The faculty take it very casually, and the students take it very casually, like they've all agreed not to be bothered too much," Mr. Singh says. He says he routinely missed a couple of days of classes a week, and it took just three or four days of cramming from the textbook at the end of the semester to pass the exams.

Others said cheating, often in collaboration with test graders, is rampant. Deepak Sharma, 26, failed several exams when he was enrolled at a top engineering college outside of Delhi, until he finally figured out the trick: Writing his mobile number on the exam paper.

That's what he did for a theory-of-computation exam, and shortly after, he says the examiner called him and offered to pass him and his friends if they paid 10,000 rupees each, about $250. He and four friends pulled together the money, and they all passed the test.

"I feel almost 99% certain that if I didn't pay the money, I would have failed the exam again," says Mr. Sharma.

BC Nakra, Pro Vice Chancellor of ITM University, where Mr. Sharma studied, said in an interview that there is no cheating at his school, and that if anyone were spotted cheating in this way, he would be "behind bars." He said he had read about a case or two in the newspaper, and in the "rarest of the rare cases, it might happen somewhere, and if you blow [it] out of all proportions, it effects the entire community." The examiner couldn't be located for comment.

Cheating aside, the Indian education system needs to change its entire orientation to focus on learning, says Saurabh Govil, senior vice president in human resources at Wipro Technologies. Wipro, India's third largest software exporter by sales, says it has struggled to find skilled workers. The problem, says Mr. Govil, is immense: "How are you able to change the mind-set that knowledge is more than a stamp?"

At 24/7 Customer's recruiting center on a recent afternoon, 40 people were filling out forms in an interior lobby filled with bucket seats. In a glass-walled conference room, a human-resources executive interviewed a group of seven applicants. Six were recent college graduates, and one said he was enrolled in a correspondence degree program.

One by one, they delivered biographical monologues in halting English. [THAT IS WHAT THE INSURGENTS CALL HINGLISH] The interviewer interrupted one young man who spoke so fast, it was hard to tell what he was saying. The young man was instructed to compose himself and start from the beginning. He tried again, speaking just as fast, and was rejected after the first round.

Another applicant, Rajan Kumar, said he earned a bachelor's degree in engineering a couple of years ago. His hobby is watching cricket, he said, and his strength is punctuality [AND TROLLING FOR YOUNG GIRLS ON THE INTERNET, LIKE THIS SLUMDOG]. The interviewer, noting his engineering degree, asked why he isn't trying to get a job in a technical field, to which he replied: "Right now, I'm here." This explanation was judged inadequate, and Mr. Kumar was eliminated, too.

A 22-year-old man named Chaudhury Laxmikant Dash, who graduated last year, also with a bachelor's in engineering, said he's a game-show winner whose hobby is international travel. But when probed by the interviewer, he conceded, "Until now I have not traveled." Still, he made it through the first-round interview, along with two others, a woman and a man who filled out his application with just one name, Robinson.

For their next challenge, they had to type 25 words a minute. The woman typed a page only to learn her pace was too slow at 18 words a minute. Mr. Dash, sweating and hunched over, couldn't get his score high enough, despite two attempts.[YOU SHOULD SEE THEM TRY TO WRITE FUCKIN' CODE -- TALK ABOUT HUNT AND PECK!]

Only Mr. Robinson moved on to the third part of the test, featuring a single paragraph about nuclear war followed by three multiple-choice questions. Mr. Robinson stared at the screen, immobilized. [ANOTHER DAY AT THE OFFICE FOR MOST SLUMDOG H-1Bs] With his failure to pass the comprehension section, the last of the original group of applicants was eliminated.

The average graduate's "ability to comprehend and converse is very low," says Satya Sai Sylada, 24/7 Customer's head of hiring for India. "That's the biggest challenge we face." [THAT IS WHY I CALL THEM MARBLE-MOUTHED RETARDS]

Indeed, demand for skilled labor continues to grow. Tata Consultancy Services, part of the Tata Group, expects to hire 65,000 people this year, up from 38,000 last year and 700 in 1986.

Trying to bridge the widening chasm between job requirements and the skills of graduates, Tata has extended its internal training program. It puts fresh graduates through 72 days of training, double the duration in 1986, says Tata chief executive N. Chandrasekaran. Tata has a special campus in south India where it trains 9,000 recruits at a time, and has plans to bump that up to 10,000.

Wipro runs an even longer, 90-day training program [AND A CRIMINAL OPERATION] to address what Mr. Govil, the human-resources executive, calls the "inherent inadequacies" in Indian engineering education. The company can train 5,000 employees at once.

Both companies sent teams of employees to India's approximately 3,000 engineering colleges to assess the quality of each before they decided where to focus their campus recruiting efforts. Tata says 300 of the schools made the cut; for Wipro, only 100 did.

Tata has also begun recruiting and training liberal-arts students with no engineering background but who want secure jobs. And Wipro has set up a foundation that spends $4 million annually to train teachers. Participants attend week-long workshops and then get follow-up online mentoring. Some say that where they used to spend a third of class time with their backs to students, drawing diagrams on the blackboard, they now engage students in discussion and use audiovisual props.


Job applicants at 24/7, which says only three of 100 are qualified.

"Before, I didn't take the students into consideration," says Vishal Nitnaware, a senior lecturer in mechanical engineering at SVPM College of Engineering in rural Maharashtra state. Now, he says, he tries to engage them, so they're less nervous to speak up and participate in discussions.

This kind of teaching might have helped D.H. Shivanand, 25, the son of farmers from a village outside of Bangalore. He just finished a master's degree in business administration—in English—from one of Bangalore's top colleges. His father borrowed the $4,500 tuition from a small lending agency. Now, almost a year after graduating, Mr. Shivanand is still looking for an entry-level finance job. [I HAD THREE BASTARDS LIKE THIS WITH INDIAN DEGREES TRY TO SNEAK INTO MY CORPORATION RECENTLY AND I SHITCANNED THEM IN THE OPENING INTERVIEW]

Tata and IBM Corp., among dozens of other firms, turned him down, he says, after he repeatedly failed to answer questions correctly in the job interviews. He says he actually knew the answers but froze because he got nervous, so he's now taking a course to improve his confidence, interviewing skills and spoken English. His family is again pitching in, paying 6,000 rupees a month for his rent, or about $130, plus 1,500 rupees for the course, or $33.

"My family has invested so much money in my education, and they don't understand why I am still not finding a job," says Mr. Shivanand. "They are hoping very, very much that I get a job soon, so after all of their investment, I will finally support them."

—Poh Si Teng and Arlene Chang contributed to this article.

Write to Geeta Anand at geeta.anand@wsj.com


tunnel rat posted on February 9, 2011 00:31

OMG, the Hinglish in Pradeep's messages is horrid, but typical of any slumdog working in corporate America today, even managers and executives.  And stalking is a pretty common practice among the "best and the brightest".  Hell, I used to get hundreds of comments a day from ghetto canines like Code Corrector and other online slumdog stalkers.  Zuckerberg should accept this and embrace this cultural phenomenon. And stop being so "xenophobic and paranoid," as some HuffPo collaborator called it!

Zuckerberg Stalker's Plea -- 'SAVE MY MOTHER'

The man accused of stalking Mark Zuckerberg claims he was only trying to reach the Facebook honcho in a last ditch effort to acquire financial assistance for his dying mother.

0208_mark_doc_launch_EXD

In a letter Pradeep Manukonda sent Mark this past January -- and obtained by TMZ -- the 31-year-old depicts himself as "a son to my mother who has become helpless in supporting his kin."

Pradeep claims his mother is suffering from a serious illness with little time to live -- though he doesn't disclose the nature of her illness.

Pradeep is also unclear about how much cash he wants from Zuckerberg -- only that he promises to "repay the entire amount incurred for her treatment."

As we previously reported, Zuck obtained a restraining order against Pradeep -- claiming he  posed a threat after he showed up at the Facebook offices and Mark's home. 

Pradeep has said he will not try to contact Mark again.


Slumdogs are at it again, this time raping the taxpayers of Indiana:

Indiana’s privately run welfare project has so many problems that the state could start taking steps to cancel its $1.16 billion contract with IBM (NYSE: IBM) as early as this fall, a state official said Tuesday.

Secretary Anne Murphy of the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration said she asked lead vendor IBM Corp. to submit a “corrective action plan” as part of a process that could result in canceling the 10-year deal if promised improvements don’t occur by the end of September. She said she expects to review data from the changes in mid-October.

...

Also criticized were ACS’ ties to Murphy’s predecessor, Mitch Roob, a former executive at the Texas-based technology vendor. Under the Indiana contract, FSSA outsourced 1,500 of its employees in 2007 to ACS to operate call centers and perform other tasks.

Roob left FSSA in January to take over Indiana’s economic development efforts, and Murphy, his deputy secretary and chief of staff, rose to FSSA’s top job. After reviewing data on the welfare project, she decided to halt its rollout and go to the governor.

“It was apparent that there were a lot of problems,” she said. “I just told him I was surprised at the level of problems with the project and that it was going to take a lot of work to correct it.”

- Link

ACS, which reported $6.16 billion in revenue for its 2008 fiscal year, does a significant amount of IT work for government agencies: about 40% of its business comes from government contracts. But most of the offshore work is being done for corporate clients, according to the ACS spokesman. The company has more flexibility to move corporate work offshore than government contracts often allow, he said.

- Link



Here's a video of the collaborator that was behind this disaster:

http://www.insideindianabusiness.com/video-player.asp?ID=9167&CategoryID=70





Posted in:   Tags: ,
Admin posted on July 6, 2009 10:44

It must suck being a slumdog now. Every day, there are more Americans revolting against the Occupational Apartheid practiced by India, Inc. Here, I got some more coverage with my comments:

New York Post: NYC Hit By Nerd Job Rob. City $$ for Indian Hires. By Susan Edelman. Full excerpt: It's a geek tragedy. While the city vows to save and create jobs for recession-ravaged New Yorkers, one of its biggest contractors is importing techies from India, instead of hiring local computer nerds.

...IBM won a $1.9 million contract with the Department of Finance to analyze its old main databases so they can be improved, but the company has transported "consultants" from Mumbai and other parts of India to do most of the work.

At least 17 employees hired by an IBM subsidiary in India have worked in New York since October, inspecting the city's computer systems, which hold property and other tax records, insiders said.
..

KevinFlanagan wrote: Indian visa workers are cheap, and that is all. The normal H-1B makes on average $23/hr. IBM bills the gov't $200/hr, and refuses to hire Americans. IBM can use the H-1B or L-1 visas to legally discriminate against American workers. They have been doing it for years. A Senate bill is working a way through the Judiciary committee that will make it almost impossible to continue this practice. SUPPORT S.887, or more Americans will be displaced. Read more: endh1b.com

And here, the Business Week article that quoted my blog posts is noted:

BusinessWeek: An Academic's Labor Helps Fight H-1B Visas. Norm Matloff, a computer science professor with a Chinese-born wife, says the U.S. skilled-immigrant visa system exploits workers everywhere. By Moira Herbst. Excerpts: Not many computer science professors are activists on immigration policy. But Norm Matloff of the University of California, Davis wears both hats. He has been a vocal critic of the H-1B visa program for skilled immigrants since the mid-1990s, and now maintains a Web page and e-mail listserv discussing offshoring and the H-1B visa program, which he calls a "sham." He says his motivation is to protect and preserve tech job opportunities for the students he teaches. ...

This is all on one site.

How can you slumdogs keep up? English is clearly not your forte, and it shows in all the daily written communications in Hinglish we Americans see everyday at work and on line. Most of you lazy arrogant bastards constantly use terms like "ur" "bcoz" "u" "i" and all sorts of illiterate shorthand that makes you look like the backwards-ass cow-urine drinkers you are. So when something comes out in the media, you have to resort to copying and pasting shit verbatim from some obscure research paper, over and over again. Just look at the comments from the slumdogs on the Business Week article. It is just raw, convoluted gibberish, like a shitload of footnotes that we're supposed to understand.

Look, slumdogs, I know that there is a saying in your community:

If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit.

I've over-heard Indians give that advice to each other. But you can only do that for so long before people figure it out.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


Admin posted on June 30, 2009 11:05

I'm a bit late to the story about how the recent Washington D.C. train wreck may have something to do with the fact that the WMTA (Washington Metro and Transit Authority) used a contractor that outsourced ALL THE CRITICAL COMPUTER WORK TO INDIA.

I've been a bit busy dealing with the media and publicizing the plight of the American techie in the midst India, Inc.'s campaign to ethnically cleanse non-Indians out of I.T. I even got some press on Business Week after chatting with writer Moira Herbst:

Others seem less enamored. "While I do admire Matloff and find his work to be substantial, his contribution to our cause has been academic and largely ignored by the I.T. industry," says "Kevin," who publishes a blog that routinely refers to Indian tech workers as "slumdogs" (itgrunt.com). "THAT IS ONE ARTICULATE [expletive]", wrote Kevin in a post in April referring to Matloff. (Matloff distances himself from "Kevin" and his Web site and says his views are "unrepresentative.")

http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/jun2009/db20090626_585028.htm


It is amazing how you create some controversy by quoting a racist slumdog CEO dissing Americans and follow it with the picture of a young Indian laying in an Australian hospital bed after getting his ass kicked.

Trust me, the two are not unrelated.

Now, back to the news...

You readers should know that, with the help of a few slumdogs, people are now dead.

American people.

Here's some notes from the blogosphere:

"Primary contractor for the DC Metro is Optimal Solutions & Technologies(OST)...

...Vivek Kundra has many connections to OST. He was even on their board.

..But that wasn’t the only reason Kundra put Optimal Solutions and Technologies in charge of nearly 100 subcontractors eager for a piece of as much as $75 million a year in technology contracts.

And what about the role of Optimal Solutions and Technologies, a D.C.-based company founded in 1999 by Vijay Narula?

Though allegedly Acar and Bansal violated city rules by regularly meeting and talking, Narula said his company, which has about eight employees assigned full time to the contract, was powerless to detect such behavior.

Remember Sushil Bansal? He was the one that was arrested and jailed, and was the reason the FBI raided Kundra’s office. Acar has been charged with bribery.

OST is heavily involved in our transportation infrastructure. They even have an FAA Software Design and Development Services Contract. Vijay Narula is their CEO. OST’s contracts are some of the most important in the nation because they involve public safety, and yet it’s very difficult to find out where Narula was born–he is very much an enigma. Try finding his biography with Google, and get back to me when you find out something.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Awards an Information Technology Contract to Optimal Solutions and Technologies (OST, Inc.)

GRPA is another outsourcer that does business with the WMATA. They have offices in India, and perhaps they send some work there...

GRPA is considered a minority owned business, which gives them a large advantage over other companies that want to win state contracts. The company name explains their minority status: G.R. Patel & Associates, Inc.
"

http://blog.vdare.com/archives/2009/06/24/dc-metro-crash-and-outsourcing-questions-the-msm-is-unlikely-to-ask/



OMG! Slumdogs are now a protected minority that gets preference for government contracts??? WTF?



Here's what 2Truthy had to say:

According to the press release, BS also has strategic relationships with multinational project engineering companies such as Forster Wheeler, Bechtel, Fluor Daniel and Montgomery Watson who successfully use Bentley technology to run single virtual teams across countries including India.

Computer failure may have caused Tuesday's fatal DC Metro train crash, according to a preliminary report by the NTSB as they search for clues to explain why the computerized system designed to prevents such disasters failed. Outsourcing/insourcing American jobs to cheap, dubiously “skilled” third world workers is not only hazardous to the financial health of American citizens and the economy but to the U.S. population's health and safety.

http://tootruthy.blogspot.com/2009/06/dc-metro-crash-computer-failure-likely.html


Even the programmers are on to the link between shitty slumdog coding and DISASTER:


"Also, the company that WMATA outsourced its work to seems to have programmers located in India - so low-quality, low-wage work might be a cause as well."

http://discuss.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?joel.3.762119.16



And of course, www.guestworkerfraud.com was one of the first to break this story.

I've already written about how offshoring loan approval work to India contributed to the sub-prime meltdown.

Now, after years of rampant offshoring to the Land That Time Forgot, aka, India, we are reaping what we sow. Financial disaster, and tragedy.

What did all these "offshoring to India", "hire any one but an American", "bring me a cheap H-1B" cheerleaders expect when they sent critical pieces of I.T. work to a country that SUPPLIES ONE THIRD OF THE WORLD'S ILLITERATE POPULATION? That is correct -- every third illiterate person in the world is an Indian.

And now people are dead.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION.



- Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies

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