As soon as insurgents saw the elevation of Microsoft's Satya Nadella to CEO, they knew that the ethnic cleansing of non-Indians would begin.  At least U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions had the balls to call bullshit on Mr. Softie's need for H-1Bs as it purges a bunch of crackers from its ranks:

 

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) criticized Microsoft founder Bill Gates for calling on Congress to increase STEM worker visas while the company plans to cut 18,000 jobs next year.

“Super billionaires aren’t happy apparently. … They declare we need to import more foreign workers,” Sessions said on the Senate floor Thursday. “Mr. Gates says we need to let more and more people into our country to take those kinds of jobs.”

 

Sessions was referring to an op-ed in which Gates called on the House to pass the bipartisan Senate immigration reform bill. That legislation would increase the number of worker visas for immigrants in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.

Sessions pointed out that Microsoft announced Thursday that it plans to layoff nearly 20,000 workers in an effort to streamline. He said those workers should take priority over immigrants.

Sessions also cited a recent U.S. census reports that stated 75 percent of U.S. citizens with STEM degrees aren’t working in that field.

“We need them working first before we bring more people in,” Sessions said. “I don’t think you can make the argument that we have a labor shortage.”

Sessions has been an ardent critic of the Senate-passed immigration reform bill, which also would provide a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants within the United States and increase spending for border security.


Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/senate/212599-sessions-teases-gates-call-for-immigrant-workers-yet-lays-off-18k#ixzz381qO8ms9 


Tunnel Rat posted on July 11, 2014 13:13

I hate to just re-post all the time, but Patrick Thibidodeau at Computerworld has been doing some amazing work lately uncovering the invasion of Curry Scented Wage Pirates.  He used be one of the doom-and-gloomers who wrote that American IT pros were fucked, but now he is a worthy Insurgent.

Court case offers a peek at how H-1B-fueled discrimination works

One-third of Infosys worksites have 100% Asian workers, lawsuit alleges

Patrick Thibodeau
 
 

July 10, 2014 (Computerworld)

The passage of the Affordable Care Act brought with it a burst of IT spending and hiring. The District of Columbia, for instance, hired offshore outsourcing firm Infosys for $49.5 million to build its Healthcare Exchange.

The India-based Infosys brought in H-1B visa holders to work on the government project. And of the approximately 100 Infosys employees working on the healthcare project, only three were American, according to a civil lawsuit filed in federal court.

The IT professional making the claim, Layla Bolten, has a degree in computer science and has been in IT since 1996. An experienced tester, which is what she was hired for, Bolten often helped less-experienced staff.

But the lawsuit contends Bolten was harassed because she was not Indian and excluded from work conversations by supervisors who spoke Hindi. People with less experience were promoted over her, and she eventually quit.

Bolten is one of four IT workers from around the country suing Infosys for "ongoing national origin and race discrimination." The lawsuit claims that "roughly 90%" of Infosys workforce is South Asian, the result of "intentional employment discrimination."

Infosys has filed a motion for dismissal on a number of technical and legal claims. The case awaits a ruling on that motion from a judge in the Eastern District of Wisconsin, where the suit was filed late last year.

Infosys officials were asked for comment beyond the dismissal request but did not immediately respond.

Whether this lawsuit is eventually dismissed, settled out of court, or goes to trial, is another matter. But the case offers insight into a contentious issue that is central to the ongoing H-1B debate.

Discrimination by race, age and sex is the leading criticism leveled at the H-1B visa program. The plaintiffs in this particular case are only making a claim of discrimination by national origin, and their case presents new facts to support itself.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission collects workplace data from employers with more than 100 employees. This data is kept confidential, unless it comes out in a court case or is voluntarily disclosed.

While few companies disclose this information, some tech companies are starting to do so. In May, Google released its workplace data, which is otherwise known as the Employer Information Report or EEO-1. It showed that 30% of its employees are women, 61% are white, 30% are Asian, 4% are of two or more races, 3% are Hispanic, and 2% are black.

When it released the data, Google said in a statement: "We're not where we want to be when it comes to diversity. And it is hard to address these kinds of challenges if you're not prepared to discuss them openly, and with the facts."

Infosys does not voluntarily disclose its diversity data for its U.S. workforce.

But the plaintiffs in the lawsuit were able to this get federal demographic data. Infosys was required to report the demographic make-up of any location at which it employs at least 50 people, according to the lawsuit. In 2012, there were 59 such Infosys sites across the U.S. that met that threshold. The lawsuit said that for more one third of the sites - 21 -- Infosys reported that 100% of the employees are Asian. For 53 of the 59 sites, at least 94.5% of the employees were Asian. The lowest percentage of Asian employees at any site was 73.8%.

Infosys is among the top three users of the H-1B visa, and H-1B workers are predominately from India. Approximately 58% of all the H-1B petitions approved in 2011 were from workers born in India; in 2012, that figure was 64%, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) data.

Offshore firms mostly hire H-1B workers from India, according to data obtained by Ron Hira, an assistant professor of public policy at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. His data shows that 97% of the H-1B visa workers hired by Infosys were from India. Other large offshore firms had similarly high percentages.

While age discrimination is not part of this lawsuit, the USCIS data helps to illustrate why critics believe H-1B workers are used to replace older workers. Of all the H-1B petitions approved in 2012, 72% were for workers between the ages of 25 and 34; in 2011, that figure was even higher, 74%.

There is no available government data on the sex of H-1B workers, but the IEEE-USA estimates that at least 80% of H-1B workers are males.

It is a fair question to ask, as the lawsuit contends, why Infosys only had three American workers working on the District of Columbia's healthcare exchange. The Washington D.C. area does not lack people with tech skills. Of the largest metropolitan areas in the U.S., Washington has the most people with advanced degrees, (22.9%) and bachelor degrees (48%).

The District's government has made hiring locally a priority. Several District officials were contacted for comment about whether the apparent use of a large number of foreign workers on a government contract is in line with hiring goals, but none responded.

 covers cloud computing and enterprise applications, outsourcing, government IT policies, data centers and IT workforce issues for Computerworld. Follow Patrick on Twitter at Twitter @DCgov or subscribe to Patrick's RSS feed Thibodeau RSS. His e-mail address ispthibodeau@computerworld.com.

See more by Patrick Thibodeau on Computerworld.com.

 

READ THE COMPLAINT HERE : 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/175546283/Amended-Complaint-Infosys

Posted in:   Tags: ,
Tunnel Rat posted on November 1, 2013 01:11

Readers of my blog knew this was coming, but this story was on the front page of the Wall Street Journal yesterday, on the front page of it's B section today, and also in the New York Times:

 

October 30, 2013
 

Federal Inquiry Into Indian Firm Puts a Focus on Widespread Visa Abuses

 

A federal investigation into visa use by Infosys, the Indian technology outsourcing giant, has brought to light widespread abuses in the industry and prompted investigations into other foreign outsourcing firms, federal officials said Wednesday.

In the largest settlement ever in an immigration case, Infosys admitted no visa violations but agreed Wednesday to pay $34 million to resolve claims made by federal prosecutors in Texas.

The amount of the settlement was relatively small for Infosys, a Bangalore-based global enterprise with 160,000 employees worldwide and reported revenues of $7.9 billion, 70 percent of it from consulting in the United States. But the case added to intensifying legal scrutiny and political skepticism in the United States facing Indian companies that use temporary visas to bring in thousands of guest workers each year for technology and software jobs in American companies.

As part of the settlement, Infosys acknowledged major errors and omissions in records it kept on its employees in the United States, including Indian temporary technology workers brought in for contract work with American companies. But it did not admit to systematic fraud, and the agreement includes a point-by-point rebuttal of prosecutors’ accusations that it tried to increase profits by illegally using short-term business visitors’ visas to bring workers from India, instead of a more expensive and less accessible temporary employment visa, known as H-1B.

“This is not a settlement about systemic visa fraud,” Stephen A. Jonas of WilmerHale, the lead lawyer representing Infosys, said Wednesday after the settlement was made public by prosecutors in Plano, Tex., where Infosys has offices. “The company adamantly denies the visa abuse allegations. They are not true.”

But federal prosecutors and investigators insisted Wednesday that they had uncovered extensive misuse of visas at Infosys. They said they agreed to the settlement because Infosys had cooperated with the investigation and moved speedily to overhaul its record-keeping and improve its visa procedures.

“While Infosys is not admitting any wrongdoing, its leadership did appreciate there were substantial problems in the way they were conducting business in this country,” said John Malcolm Bales, the United States attorney for the Eastern District of Texas, in Plano. “We think they’ve cleaned up their act.”

Each year there is a scramble among technology companies for H-1B employment visas, because there is a basic annual cap of 65,000 visas. In the past three years, Infosys and two other Indian companies — Wipro and Tata Consultancy Services — were among the top five recipients of those visas, according to Ron Hira, a professor at Rochester Institute of Technology who studies the visa system.

The largest user, Cognizant, is an American company that brought in nearly 18,000 foreign workers, almost all from India, Mr. Hira said.

American technology companies have been clamoring for an increase in H-1B visas, saying they face shortages of Americans with advanced skills. A large increase was part of broad immigration legislation that passed the Senate in June, and there is also a measure to raise the limits before the House of Representatives. But the Senate bill also included new protections for Americans that would make it more difficult for foreign outsourcing companies to bring in temporary workers.

It is not clear whether Congress will take further action on those bills this year.

In recent years Congress has sharply raised visa fees for foreign outsourcing companies while immigration authorities imposed new regulations to limit the movement of foreign technology workers in the United States.

“In the past few years there has been a real assault by the federal government on the information technology consulting industry, and it has hit the Indian companies particularly hard,” said Avram Morell, an immigration lawyer in New York.

Infosys has vigorously disputed the government’s accusations. Mr. Jonas, the company’s lawyer, said the government had failed to prove that foreign workers on business visitor visas, known as B-1, were doing any work that was not authorized under their visas. He said no evidence had emerged that any foreign workers ever remained in the United States after their visas had expired.

Since 2011, Infosys put in place new record-keeping and visa procedures and later placed new limitations on the activities in the United States of B-1 visitor visa holders, improvements that were acknowledged in the settlement.

But federal investigators said Wednesday that they had uncovered numerous cases in which Infosys had brought in Indian workers on B-1 visas, to do work not allowed under that visa. Investigators from the State Department and the Department of Homeland Security examined 6,500 B-1 visas Infosys had used to bring in Indian workers over five years.

“The vast majority were illegitimate,” said George M. Nutwell, a special agent in charge of the State Department Diplomatic Security Service in Houston. Investigators went to the American companies where the B-1 workers were placed and discovered they were doing programming and technology engineering work similar to H-1B workers. The business visitor visa is primarily for attending training sessions and meetings, not for work.

“Infosys cheated, plain and simple,” Mr. Nutwell said.


Pamela Kripke contributed reporting.

 

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION

 


Readers of this blog should be familiar with the name Sarvesh Dharayan, head of the notorious bodyshop Apex Technology Group Incorporated.  He first surfaced as "Shawn Gibson", threatening me and several other insurgents because one of his slumdogs had exposed details about his illegal activity regarding H-1Bs and we had spread the word.  He then hired mob-lawyer Patrick Papalia to harass me.  Eventually, Sarvesh got a corrupt judge (probably with a bribe) named James P. Hurley (who promptly retired) to shut down a few insurgent blogs, including mine.  This Desi pimp and his dumbass wop lawyer went to great lengths to try to shut me down, and I had to host the blog in other countries, first Panama, then Canada, and finally Malaysia, its current home.

Well Karma is a bitch, and it seems to have bit Sarvesh in the ass.  He was just arrested in connection with a $2.3 million bribery and kickback scheme, which was reported to me by one of my readers just yesterday.  I finished reading the complaint filed by the feds, and it is a sordid story.  It involves some unnamed New York company involved with Medicare and the HHS, who was scammed by one of its executives who was getting kickbacks for placing slumdogs from Apex at the company.  

Like I have always said, there is no way entire IT departments can be filled with illiterate slumdogs without some corrupt collaborator getting a cut of the action.  This is the classic MO of slumdog slave traders -- kickback a cut of the hourly billing (which in this case appears to be about $105-$115) to the collaborator, net about $65, and pay the slumdog probably about half that.  Shit, I make about $80/hr after my agency gets its cut of probably a similar rate, so Sarvesh was making a fucking killing.

Sarvesh Dharayan (aka Sarvesh Kumar Dharayan) has been busy lately.  He recently tried to get on the school board, probably to obtain more political connections and further his schemes.  It also looks like he was trying to buy political influence by making some healthy contributions to N.J. Governor Christie.  

 

Finally, this fat Desi fuck is on Facebook (or he has a Facebook page, because he is probably in jail currently).

https://www.facebook.com/dharayan

Like I always said...

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION

 


Prolific blogger and honorary insurgent has seen fit to comment on my recent post.  His post is excellent:

 

Via the “Tunnel Rat”‘s excellent High Tech Insurgent website. Tunnel Rat is a fine US IT worker, currently slaving at a Hindu-infested US IT firm. His identity is a closely held secret. He is widely hated by Hindu Indian H-1B job thieves and their parasitical cheering section, which sadly includes much of the US Left, of all people.

The US IT worker is an icon, a dying icon, dying like the buffalo exterminated on the US plains. A traitor class of US upper middle class and upper class managerial and corporate elite have conspired to kill the best and the brightest of US minds, our great IT workers, by importing vast numbers of Hindus to steal their jobs.

- Link


It is now official, now that the Wall Street Journal has stopped being the cheerleaders for more H-1Bs.  And it is also amazing that the "Indian outsourcing giants" can call this bill discriminatory when they refuse hire Americans to staff consulting gigs in the US, and instead turn every fucking project they take over it a nepotistic curry den:

A fight is brewing between Washington and New Delhi over provisions in the U.S.'s draft immigration bill that could hobble Indian outsourcing firms' businesses in the U.S.

The proposals, which include cutting back sharply on the number of foreign workers these outsourcing companies can send to their U.S. offices, have won broad support from rival U.S. technology firms, including International Business Machines Corp. IBM +0.05% and Accenture ACN +1.98% PLC, lobbyists say.

India's $110 billion IT industry, which performs back-office tasks such as software programming, makes about half its revenue from the U.S.

Indian companies such as Infosys Ltd., 500209.BY -0.84% Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. 532540.BY -1.16% and Wipro Ltd. 507685.BY -0.82% have set up large U.S. offices to be closer to clients, staffing the sites overwhelmingly with Indian expatriates, who earn significantly less than their American counterparts.

The model has been challenged in recent years by U.S. politicians, who argue Indian outsourcing companies are misusing the program to undercut local technology-sector workers.

Now, big U.S. tech companies, which want to hire more foreign workers but can't because of competition with Indian firms for available visas, have joined the fray.

U.S. tech firms successfully lobbied for the draft immigration bill to include caps on the number of foreign workers a U.S.-based company can employ on skilled-worker visas, according to lobbyists working for U.S. firms and another representing Indian outsourcers.

The bill doesn't name countries. But Indian outsourcing giants sponsor more than half the 65,000 skilled-worker permits, known as H1-B visas, that the U.S. issues annually to workers with at least a bachelor's degree.

Many of these firms have as much as 80% of their staff in the U.S. on H1-B and other visas. The draft legislation, which is being debated in the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, would prohibit companies with more than 75% of their employees in the U.S. on such visas from bringing in additional workers. That figure would fall to 65% within a year, and in the years after that the limit would be 50%.

IBM and Accenture declined to comment.

The U.S. firms are seeking to hire more foreign workers for high-skilled jobs but face a visa shortage because of competition with Indian firms.

Earlier this month, U.S.-based employers exhausted the annual 65,000-person quota for H1-B visas within days of the opening of applications, a sign of the strengthening domestic economy.

The immigration bill also seeks to raise the yearly cap on H1-B visas to 180,000. The cap on foreign workers means U.S. companies could benefit, while Indian firms would have to hire more U.S. employees.

Firms that don't comply will be barred from sending consultants to work in clients' offices, a business that accounts for roughly 50% of Indian companies' revenue in the U.S.

The foreign-worker caps were designed to get political backing to increase the number of available H1-B visas, people familiar with the negotiations said, and U.S. firms were concerned that a broader curb on visas would reduce their ability to hire more from overseas amid a dearth of U.S. computer graduates

Som Mittal, president of the National Association of Software and Services Companies, an India IT trade body, warned the bill was "discriminatory" and might ignite a trade war. The association estimates the regulations could wipe out a quarter of the Indian IT sector's global revenue.

Indian Finance Minister P. Chidambaram raised concerns about the bill with U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew during a meeting last week in Washington. He told Mr. Lew the issue of short-term work visas shouldn't be mixed up with immigration, according to an account of the meeting Mr. Chidambaram gave to Indian media.

Commercial relations between the nations are already tense because of recent Indian regulations that would impose a sweeping "Buy India" mandate, requiring that large portions of high-tech products purchased by the government be manufactured locally. U.S. and other foreign companies are lobbying against the rules, saying they conflict with free-trade norms. Other areas of contention include India's efforts to increase its tax haul, which overseas companies complain has caused confusion for investors.

India argues the provisions are needed to curb technology imports from the U.S. and spur domestic manufacturing.

Indian companies claim the U.S.'s latest proposals to restrict visas could also amount to restrictions on free trade.

But many U.S. members of Congress contend India is misusing the H-1B system to bring in fairly low-skilled employees, denying those places to higher-skilled workers that U.S. firms want to hire.

On Monday, at a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss the immigration bill, Brad Smith, Microsoft Corp.'s MSFT +3.79% chief counsel, said the company couldn't get enough visas for high-skilled jobs that it can't fill through hiring in the U.S.

"We are not able to fill all the jobs that we are creating," Mr. Smith said in testimony. He told the committee that Indian outsourcing firms must "evolve their business models" by hiring more Americans.

Microsoft and IBM have recently expanded their presence in India, where they have hired thousands of local employees.

Sen. Richard Durbin (D., Ill.) said in response that the situation was an abuse of the visa regime. "Most people would think, well, Microsoft needs these folks," he said. "And they'd be shocked to know that most of the H-1B visas are not going to companies like yours. They're going to these outsourcing companies."

Indian firms say that over the past three years, in anticipation of the visa changes, they began hiring U.S. employees at a faster rate than new foreign workers.

Nasscom, the association of Indian IT firms, said the efforts faced roadblocks because of a lack of qualified U.S. graduates.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2013, the U.S. economy will create approximately 120,000 new jobs for people with degrees in computer science.

In his testimony before the Senate committee, Mr. Smith of Microsoft said that, by his own company's calculations, U.S. colleges produce under half that number of graduates annually.

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323551004578441070153741766.html


Tunnel Rat posted on March 13, 2013 13:17

FROM CWA:

Corporations are at it again.


This time they are taking advantage of temporary workers to drive down wages and working conditions for U.S. workers.

Loopholes, like the ones inside the H1-B visa program, allow big businesses to hire temporary workers from other countries at substandard wages. American workers making $60,000 or more are being replaced by temporary workers making half as much.

Unbelievably, a group of Senators wants to expand this program by issuing even more H1-B visas. Email your Senators today and tell them to stop the expansion of the H1-B visa program.

Workers holding  H1-B visas are at the mercy of their employers. They cannot move from one employer to the next without the risk of deportation. They cannot organize to negotiate for better wages or working conditions.

Big companies like IBM, Accenture and Infosys claim that these visas help improve our competitiveness by bringing highly skilled workers to the U.S., but a recent study showed that most of these workers return home, taking their skills with them. Instead of providing a path to citizenship, the H1-B visa program helps facilitate offshoring.[1]

Email your Senators today and tell them to oppose Senate Bill 169, ...


Tunnel Rat posted on October 28, 2012 02:07

Robert X. Cringlely has been covering IT for decades and has been critical of Indian Bowel Movement's (IBM) labor practices and ethnic cleansing of American techies.  Here he destroys many of the myths regarding the slumdog scabs and their (ab)use by the high-tech junta:

The H-1B visa program was created in 1990 to allow companies to bring skilled technical workers into the USA. It’s a non-immigrant visa and so has nothing at all to do with staying in the country, becoming a citizen, or starting a business. Big tech employers are constantly lobbying for increases in H-1B quotas citing their inability to find qualified US job applicants. Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates and other leaders from the IT industry have testified about this before Congress. Both major political parties embrace the H-1B program with varying levels of enthusiasm.

But Bill Gates is wrong. What he said to Congress may have been right for Microsoft but was wrong for America and can only lead to lower wages, lower employment, and a lower standard of living. This is a bigger deal than people understand: it’s the rebirth of industrial labor relations circa 1920. Our ignorance about the H-1B visa program is being used to unfairly limit wages and steal -- yes, steal -- jobs from US citizens...

http://betanews.com/2012/10/25/h-1b-visa-abuse-limits-wages-and-steals-us-jobs/

This article also his getting traction at Slashdot, and the many comments are revealing.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


Tunnel Rat posted on September 2, 2012 00:14

Rest assured, this happens EVERY DAY in corporate America...

Toyota sues programmer for 'sabotaging' computer network

By for Zero Day |August 30, 2012 -- 13:16 GMT (06:16 PDT)

Summary: Automaker Toyota alleges that one of its former programmers sabotaged web applications and security systems.

Automaker Toyota alleges that one of its former programmers sabotaged web applications and security systems, and has filed a lawsuit in reprisal.

Ibrahimshah Shahulhameed was fired last week by the corporation. In an Aug. 24 complaint, Toyota says that the former programmer sabotaged its computer systems at Toyota Motor Manufacturing.

The Indian contract programmer apparently attacked the system -- crashing it in the process -- and managed to download information that is "highly confidential".

The complaint was submitted to the U.S. District Court in Lexington. Toyota says within the lawsuit:

"If this information were disseminated to competitors or otherwise made public, it would be highly damaging to Toyota and its suppliers, causing immediate and irreparable damage. The worker had no authority to access or use Toyota's property or trade secrets and it is undisputed that he did access it and altered computer programs and codes."

After being dismissed for unacceptable behavior, Shahulhameed allegedly accessed the U.S. parts supply website portal toyotasupplier.com, manipulating 3 web applications and altering security certificates that caused system failure. After doing so, the programmer downloaded documents including pricing specs, parts and quality testing data. The company believes that if this data falls into third-party hands, it could cause irreparable harm.

The complaint says it will "take days for Toyota's IT department to determine the full extent of its damage as a result of th Defendant's efforts to sabotage its system."

The rapidly-filed lawsuit also includes a temporary restraining order issued from U.S. judge Karen Caldwell, banning the programmer from leaving the country while the investigation proceeds. Shahulhameed has also been ordered to hand over all of Toyota's property and data.

According to reports, the automaker's officials don't believe sensitive company material has been distributed. Toyota spokesman Rick Hesterberg said:

"We are and will continue to investigate this thoroughly, but currently we do not believe that any supplier data or proprietary information has been distributed."

- ZDNet

 

HERE'S MORE:

 

Judge stops ex-Toyota worker from leaving country

Updated 12:47 p.m., Monday, August 27, 2012

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A federal judge has ordered a former computer programmer for Toyota from leaving the United States while the company investigates the damage done by an alleged computer hacking incident.

U.S. District Judge Karen Caldwell in Lexington also ordered Ibrahimshah Shahulhameed of Georgetown, Ky., to forfeit any information and data he took from the computer system of Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America.

In a lawsuit filed in federal court in Lexington, Toyota alleged that Shahulhameed illegally accessed the website www.toyotasupplier.com after being dismissed from his contract position on Thursday. The company claims Shahulhameed reset the website and computer system to automatically crash.

Rick Hesterberg, a Toyota Motor Manufacturing spokesman, said the company is still gathering facts in the case.

"This is an ongoing investigation involving a former contractor," Hesterberg told The Associated Press.

Efforts to locate Shahulhameed were not immediately successful Monday afternoon.

Shahulhameed worked on contract as a computer programmer for Toyota until being let go on Thursday. At that point, Toyota alleged, Shahulhameed, a native of India, accessed Toyota's internal computer system without authorization and copied, downloaded and possibly disseminated trade secrets and proprietary information. Included in that information was pricing information, quality testing data and parts testing data, Toyota's attorney, Mindy Barfield, wrote in the complaint.

"If this information were disseminated to competitors or otherwise made public, it would be highly damaging to Toyota, and its suppliers, causing immediate and irreparable damage," Barfield wrote.

Toyota claims that Shahulhameed spent more than six hours inside the computer system's firewall on Thursday and Friday. Toyota also said Shahulhameed reprogrammed at least 13 applications the computer system in an effort to cause it to crash.

Barfield wrote that Shahulhameed also removed critical security certifications on the company's internal server, causing the programs to become inoperable.

Barfield was unsure how long it would take for Toyota's technology department to repair the damage. The website www.toyotasupplier.com serves as a portal for current suppliers to Toyota, as well as a place for companies seeking to do business with Toyota to find information and work in a potential deal. As of Monday afternoon, the site appeared to be working.

"(Shahulhameed) had no authority to access or use Toyota's property or trade secrets and it is undisputed that he did access it and altered computer programs and codes," Barfield wrote.

Caldwell, in an order issued Saturday, barred Shahulhameed from traveling out of the country for 14 days. Caldwell noted that Shahulhameed had planned to leave the United States and return to India for an undetermined amount of time.

Shahulhameed was also required to post $2,500 bond, which he did Monday.

Toyota is seeking unspecified compensatory and punitive damages from Shahulhameed.

 


Tunnel Rat posted on June 17, 2012 22:06

I first blogged about Srinivas Doppalapudi back in July 2010, after he was charged with slumdog slave trading.  At the time, his collaborator lawyer said that this scumbag merely made mistakes with his paperwork. As was the case with Apex Technology Group, warnings about this douchbag's crimes were being posted on the Internet long before the U.S. gov't got on the case.  Like Apex's Sarvesh Kumar Dharayan,  Srinivas even tried to use the same tactic of filing a DMCA takedown notice in an attempt to silence his victims.

Now this Indian fucker gets to sit in jail until his sentencing and eventual deportation, which is a good thing. 

       
Wilmington, Del. – United States Attorney Charles M. Oberly, III, announced Srinivas Doppalapudi, a 45 year old citizen of India, in the United States with permanent legal residency (green card) status, pleaded guilty today District Court Sue L. Robinson to visa fraud and money laundering.  Doppalapudi’s sentencing has been tentatively scheduled for a date in September.
 
According to statements made and documents filed in court, from March 2007, through September 2010, Doppalapudi submitted 33 fraudulent H-1B visa applications.  In entering his guilty plea to visa fraud, Doppalapudi admitted that from March 2007 through September 2010, he operated several businesses which variously applied for H-1B visas and that on 33 occasions he submitted to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service, service contracts which were false, in that, no such agreement or contract existed and the contracts bore the forged signature of one of the purported parties.  Most of the aliens in whose names Doppalapudi requested H-1B visas were in the United States on student visas which were about to expire.
 
During the period in question, Doppalapudi wire transferred more than $1 million dollars from his business bank accounts in the United States to a bank account in India.  Doppalapudi’s guilty plea to money laundering relates to his transfer of funds, criminally derived from his visa fraud scheme, from his business accounts to his personal account.
 
Upon entering his guilty plea, the prosecutor asked that the Court to revoke the defendant’s release on bail and to detain Doppalapudi pending sentencing, which Judge Robinson tentatively scheduled for September.  The government advised that Doppalapudi was facing certain deportation upon sentencing and had no incentive to return to sentencing.  The government further argued that detention was warranted due to the following: during the commission of the offense he wired transferred in excess of $1 million dollars from his U.S. bank accounts to a bank account in India; that his business website listed offices in India, Singapore, and Canada; and on nine occasions from 2008 through the date of his arrest in July 2011, he had traveled internationally.  Edmund D. Lyons, Esquire, counsel for defendant, opposed detention, noting that for the last 11 months following his arrest Doppalapudi had been on house arrest with electronic monitoring and fully compliant with all conditions of release.  Judge Robinson granted the government’s motion and detained without bail  Doppalapudi pending sentencing.
 
Visa fraud, a violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1546(a), and money laundering, a violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1957, each are punishable by a maximum penalty of ten years’ incarceration and a $250,000 fine.
 
The “H-1B Specialty Workers” visa program allows an employer to temporarily employ a foreign worker in the United States on a non-immigrant basis in a “specialty occupation.”  Current laws limit to 62,000 the number of such visas that may be issued annually.  The H-1B visa application process is the responsibility of the employer, not the employee.  Accordingly, it is the employer, not the employee, who applies for the H-1B visa.  If the employer’s application is granted, the H-1B visa is issued to the employer, not the non-immigrant employee.  H-1B visas are issued by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service and are valid for a period of employment of up to three years.  Thereafter, the employer may seek an extension to this status, for up to a maximum continuous period of six years.
 
Those employers petitioning for H-1B visas may not lawfully engage in the practice of “speculative employment,” a term used to describe a circumstance in which petitioner does not have an available employment position, but still files a visa request on behalf of a foreign worker.  In doing so, the petitioner speculates that, at some point in the future, the petitioner may be able to secure the foreign worker a job.  In filing such paperwork, the petitioner fraudulently represents that a specific job opportunity is presently available, when, in fact, it is not.
 
Those employers petitioning for H-1B visas also may not lawfully engage in the practice of “benching workers,” a term used to describe a circumstance in which petitioners engages in speculative employment and then after the non-immigrant worker makes himself/herself available for work, the employer places the worker on “the bench,” that is, in an apartment for otherwise, without pay, while the worker awaits a job placement or searches for his/her own job placement.
 
The prosecution was a result of a joint investigation by the United States Department of Labor, Office of Inspector General, Office of Labor Racketeering and Fraud Investigations; the Internal Revenue Service – Criminal Investigation Division; and Immigration and Customs Enforcement; and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service – Office of Fraud Detection and National Security.


- Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies

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