There is more retribution to come...

 

Cantor, a reliable 'yes' vote for raising the H-1B visa cap, is unseated

GOP House Majority Leader Eric Cantor supported the H-1B visa; his challenger did not

Patrick Thibodeau
 
 

June 11, 2014 (Computerworld)

WASHINGTON -- Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.), the House majority leader who lost a primary bid Tuesday for re-election, was a reliable "yes" vote for increasing the H-1B visa cap.

Cantor lost to challenger David Brat, a professor at Randolph-Macon College with a Ph.D. in economics -- and an opponent of the H-1B visa.

Brat's victory doesn't signal a reversal in bipartisan support in Congress for increasing the number of H-1B visas. Cantor saw the visa program as an area for bipartisan agreement, and he was on solid ground in saying so.

The Senate's bipartisan immigration bill, approved last year, would more than double the H-1B cap, increasing it from 85,000 to 180,000 annually. The fight over immigration has focused more on providing a path to citizenship for the approximate 12 million illegal immigrants in the U.S., not on raising the H-1B visa cap.

Few candidates in either party draw attention to the H-1B visa in their races. But Brat used the H-1B against Cantor.

In one statement, Brat wrote: "The Chamber wants low-skilled cheap labor; Mark Zuckerberg wants high-skilled cheap labor, but, at the end of the day, what they have in common is that they all want cheap labor and Eric Cantor wants to give it to them."

It's hard to know whether Brat's use of the H-1B visa, by itself, made much a difference in this contest or whether it will encourage others to attack the visa program.

Facebook's Zuckerberg is an active supporter for increasing the H-1B cap, and helped to create a lobbying group, FWD.us. In the wake of Cantor's defeat, the group put the best spin it could on Cantor loss by pointing, in a Twitter message, to a Public Policy poll (download PDF) that assessed voter support on various issues in Cantor's district. On the subject of immigration, when asked about providing eligibility for a path to citizenship, 40% of the respondents strongly support, and 32% somewhat supported.

Cantor, and other Republican leaders, reached out to the tech industry, and believed that a free market ethos and message was in synch with Silicon Valley's start-up culture. In a 2011 speech at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, Cantor talked about creating a better environment for start-ups with tax and regulatory reform.

That same year, Cantor and his fellow so-called "young guns," U.S., Rep. Paul Ryan, the Budget Committee chair, and Kevin McCarthy, the House majority whip, appeared with Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's chief operating officer, at a town hall meeting that was streamed live.

Tech-related contributions to Cantor in the 2014 election cycle totaled $82,000, far below securities and investment industry contributors, who sent in $677,000 and real estate contributions that totaled $268,000.

Cantor's largest tech contributor was Oracle, which sent $25,000.

The fate of the H-1B visa cap has been tied to the broader issue of immigration reform, where there are much larger divisions. This has thwarted efforts by lawmakers to treat the H-1B visa as a separate issue and to raise the cap independent of comprehensive immigration reform.

Without a doubt, the tech industry lost one vote for an H-1B cap increase with Cantor's defeat, and Brat's win may kill any chance of immigration reform in this Congress. But Brat's attack on the H-1B program doesn't necessarily mean that other Republicans, who have backed a cap increase, will reconsider their support for the temporary work visa, and abandon the tech industry on what may be its top issue.

 covers cloud computing and enterprise applications, outsourcing, government IT policies, data centers and IT workforce issues for Computerworld. Follow Patrick on Twitter at Twitter @DCgov or subscribe to Patrick's RSS feed Thibodeau RSS. His e-mail address ispthibodeau@computerworld.com.

See more by Patrick Thibodeau on Computerworld.com.


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It is not surprising that magic-underwear candidate Mitt Romney supports the importation of scabs to displace Americans.  After all, in his previous life, he was an evangelist for the outsourcing/offshoring regime at McKinsey and Bain Capital.

But now this dumb fuck Mormon is paying back his NASSCOM sponsors with some bullshit rhetoric about the US needing more slumdogs to put even more locals out of work.  It all just makes me want to go all "Taxi Driver" on his ass.


Romney sees tech skills shortage, and H-1B visa need

Experts rebut Romney's claim that 1.25 million high skill jobs are unfilled in U.S.

Patrick Thibodeau
 

September 7, 2011 (Computerworld)

WASHINGTON -- Mitt Romney, a top candidate for the Republican presidential nomination, has released an economic plan that would make it easier for foreign college graduates with advanced degrees in math, science and engineering to work in the U.S.

Romney's plan, unveiled this week, includes a proposal "to raise the ceiling" on visas for holders of advanced degrees in math, science "who have job offers in those fields from U.S. companies."

"These workers would not displace unemployed Americans. Rather, they would fill high-skill job openings for which there is currently an acute shortage of labor," wrote Romney, a former Massachusetts governor, in his plan.

The U.S. caps H-1B visas at 85,000 a year. Current regulations set aside 20,000 of those visas for advanced degree graduates of U.S. universities.

Romney's proposal doesn't stipulate that advanced degree holders be graduates from U.S. universities.

Romney's plan also calls for "stapling" green cards to the diplomas of technical degree graduates of U.S. universities, a plan that has been proposed by lawmakers on both sides in Congress without success.

"Even in this tough unemployment climate, as of this past spring nearly 1.25 million high-skill jobs remained unfilled," said Romney, in the economic plan released Tuesday. "A skills gap of that magnitude suppresses the productivity of our businesses and slows the overall economy. Highly educated immigrants would help fill that gap and get our economy rolling again."

Ron Hira, a public policy professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, characterized as "dubious" Romney's claim that there is 1.25 million unfilled high-skilled positions.

"None of the official statistics support a claim that there's a shortage of these occupations," said Hira. "Unemployment rates for these occupations continue to be twice what they should be at full employment..."

- more

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION


Don Tennant at ITBusinessEdge.com has been, until recently, a vigorous peddler of propaganda and lies supporting the slumdog slave trade. The insurgency has been hammering him hard for months, and obviously getting under his skin.  I've been banned from even reading his blog, and even politically correct, articulate insurgents like Donna Conroy of BrightFutureJobs.com have been admonished by "Mubai Don" for not toeing the party line when it comes to the Indian Outsourcing Regime.  He frequentlty baited and taunted American techies, going so far as to issue thinly-vield threats of blacklisting anybody who crossed him.

But recently, he started blogging about the crimes committed by Infosys, and the ethnic cleansing of Americans at Cisco, and something must have snapped.  Or perhaps some insurgents paid a visit to his Maine residence and asked him to ponder the wisdom of shipping young men his son's age to die in Iraq and Afghanistan while we import tons of young marble-mouthed retards from India to do nothing but chair warming and booger farming. 

Either way, here is his Mea Culpa:

I Was Wrong — The H-1B Visa Program Must Be Abolished

Posted by Don Tennant                Jun 6, 2011 9:35:59 PM

In the 10 years or so that I’ve been writing about the H-1B visa program, I have steadfastly argued that despite rampant abuse of the system, the positive contributions of many, many people here on H-1B visas warrant continued support of the program. I was wrong. The H-1B visa program needs to be abolished.

It has long been my view that our focus should be on fighting abuse of the program, rather than on fighting for its annihilation. I have been so sickened for so long by the hatefulness of anti-H-1B fanatics who have capitalized on the issue to spew anti-foreigner venom that I was compelled to find every reason I could to support what they hate. I have argued for years that the hatefulness is horribly damaging to the effort to fix the H-1B program, and I feel as strongly about that now as I ever have. But what I have come to recognize is that the H-1B program in irreparable. So I was wrong to support its continued existence.

It wasn’t an easy conclusion to come to. I remain humbled and inspired by the examples set by many families whose outstanding accomplishments here have been made possible by the H-1B program. I remain blown away by the fact the 60 percent of the finalists in the 2011 Intel Science Talent Search competition are the children of parents who came to the United States on H-1B visas, and I see absolutely no reason to try to discredit that competition or those findings as a means of discrediting the H-1B program. I remain blown away by the stories of people like Dan Simpelo, a high school senior in New City, N.Y., whose family came here from the Philippines four years ago, and whose father had come here two years earlier on an H-1B visa. Dan, whose first language is not English, was the valedictorian of his graduating class of 390 seniors. It’s very difficult for me to call for the abolition of a visa program that has made stories like that possible. But I had no choice.

What changed for me is that finally — finally — the voice of reason has drowned out the voice of hate. There’s no better example than the string of hundreds of reader comments that were contributed in response to my recent post, "Will H-1B Visa Holders Feel the Pain of Impending Cisco Layoffs?" Yes, that reader commentary was spiked with the requisite bickering and mean-spiritedness that have marred the discussion on both sides all along. But what predominated was reasoned, compelling, substantiated information contributed by knowledgeable, thoughtful individuals whose inclination is to challenge and document abuse of the program rather than deride and lambast the individuals who hold the visas the program has created.

One of the most reasoned, sensible and articulate voices in opposition to the H-1B program has been that of Roy Lawson, a software developer in Florida who regularly contributes his commentary to the postings here. He made several comments in response to the aforementioned post, none more important than the one in which he conveyed this viewpoint:

I believe [the H-1B program] is flawed beyond repair, and as such it needs to be abolished in favor of something smarter. I believe that corporations should not be immigration middle-men. Immigration is about something much more pure and sacrosanct than corporate profits. I believe it needs to be abolished in favor of permanent immigration, self sponsorship as opposed to corporate sponsorship, the favoring of relatives (families) over new immigrants, and sustainable numbers. I would limit new immigration to 25% of net job gains each year. In years where we have job loss, I would restrict immigration. Finally, certainly more people would apply than we have openings for. I would make the acceptance based on merit, not first come or a lottery. … My case is about economics and national interest, and has nothing to do with race. In fact, I want greater protections for immigrants. I believe the reason they are so easily exploited is because of corporate sponsorship. Green cards (in sustainable numbers) would make them equal players in the labor market. An H-1b visa amounts to second class labor and corporate sponsorship gives companies leverage against your wages and salary. This hurts you directly and it hurts us indirectly – because we now must compete against workers who are easily exploited.

While some of his points are fodder for additional legitimate debate, in essence, Roy is right. I want to express my thanks to him and to all of the other readers who have worked so diligently to make the anti-H-1B argument not only in a way that is convincing, but in a way that upholds the principles of honor, compassion, fairness and decency that our country stands for. I’m proud to join you in opposition to the H-1B program.

Don cites Roy Lawson as his saviour.  Roy used to be a finger wagging scold in the movement, contantly harping on the insurgents to stop talking about the Indians, but of late Roy has trafficked heavily in the connection between Hindoos and Nazis, and the caste system that is part of the slumdog DNA.  As I always say, I'd rather be perceived a racist than confirmed a coward.

Now, the shills for the H-1B visa are few and far between.  Most don't need the redicule and shaming (and even death threats) that come with a puff-piece proclaiming the intellectual superiority of slumdogs and the lie that we need them to run our IT departments.  Business Week had Moira Herbst and Steve Hamm (and Vivek Fraudwha) who made up what I used to call the Tandoori Trifecta, but now all that is left to peddle the NASSCOM lies is the Punjabi Professor.  Moira interviewed me by phone, and then her editor had to make a groveling apology to IVers who threatened to rape her and throw acid in his face if they did not remove the link to my blog.  She hasn't been heard from since Bloomberg bought Business Week.  As for Steve Hamm, who, after spending years working as a shill for NASSCOM, did a hard-hitting piece called "America's High-Tech Sweatshops" and then ran off work at Indian Bowel Movement (IBM).

Even NASSCOM agent Vivek Wadhwa has tired of the threats and stalking that come with the territory, and slinked off to the Washington Post to write mushy crap about "innovation" and "immigrants" with not a mention of fuckin' H-1Bs.  Fellow Desi shill Farhad Manjoo regurgitated one article with Wadhwa's lies, and was last seen crying to the FBI and blogging on Slate about the lastest iPhone.

There really is nothing left for the H-1Bs now.  They are slowly getting shitcanned at American companies, and forced to become illegal aliens, working at motels, cigar shops, and dry cleaners.  Of course, that beats the hell out of going back to India, which even the enlightened New York Times has deemed a stinking shithole full feral racist scum.  Even at Vivek's new home at the Washington Post, over 700 commenters countered the biased notion that H-1Bs are somehow smarter than the locals.  The Hispanics are also getting the hint, and are tiring of being denigrated as criminals by the chest-thumping Indians that proclaim themselves to be the "better brown immigrants."

 

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION

 

 


tunnel rat posted on June 4, 2011 13:04

Back 2009, I reported on how a Desi bodyshop ripped off New York City to the tune of $15 million, and now there is news of yet another dry anal rape of NYC taxpayers at the hands of more slumdog slave traders:

June 1, 2011, 2:41 pm

Company Tied to Payroll Project Shuts Down

WAYNE, N.J. — A New Jersey technology company that had been a major contractor on the Bloomberg administration’s troubled CityTime payroll project abruptly halted operations and terminated its employees amid a widening city and federal investigation, according to a company memorandum sent out this week.

The top two executives of the company, TechnoDyne L.L.C., have returned to their native India, according to people familiar with the case who were not authorized to speak publicly because the investigation was continuing.

Whether the executives — Reddy and Padma Allen, American citizens who are husband and wife — will return is unclear. They are alluded to but not identified by name as co-conspirators in a federal complaint that was made public on Friday; neither they nor their company has been charged...

So these maderchads got busted, packed their shit and went back to that 3rd-world sewer called India?  WTF?  Why can't this happen to every slumdog slave trader?

But wait, it gets even more interesting...

...The company, which investigators said relied on Science Applications International for 80 percent of its revenue, pledged to cooperate with immigration lawyers to help workers who have H-1B visas or green cards. The company also said it would keep employees updated on compensation, health insurance and other issues.

A spokeswoman for the company did not respond to phone calls and e-mails to her. Meanwhile, a visit to the company’s two addresses here on Wednesday — one in an office park, the other at a U.P.S. store — did not reveal any activity or presence, other than the company’s name tacked onto a building directory. One person who works in the office park said few people had shown up to TechnoDyne’s office in recent months.

TechnoDyne billed itself as an information technology consulting company that helped governments and private businesses with software development and cloud-computing management...

OMG!  You mean they used low-wage, low-skill slumdogs? 

WELL GUESS WHAT, SLUMDOGS.  YOU HAVE THIRTY DAYS TO PACK YOUR SHIT AND GO HOME!

I've already contacted my friends at the N.J. Department of Labor to make sure that they keep an eye out on you scabs, and they will make sure that you are deported ASAP.

In the meantime, Insurgents can target the fat fuck collaborator who enabled this rape of NYC taxpayers, Gerard Denault:

He is out on bail and can easily be tracked down. 

Happy hunting.

THERE WILL BE RETRIBUTION

 

 


tunnel rat posted on March 11, 2011 02:04

Here's a good article from San Diego, taking a swipe at Qualcomm, the notorious Curry Den known as "Little Calcutta."  I've been getting a lot of traffic lately from Qualcomm IPs, so the slumdogs that make up 60% of QCOM employees must be getting interested in my rants (or paranoid about a displaced American techie like fellow Eastern European George Jakubec blowing up their MindLance guest house), or the collaborators (like 'pellis') that make up the rest of the company fear that they may get accidently "pushed" in front of the SD trolley on their way to a drunken binge in TJ:

Are American Engineers in Short Supply?

Back in 1950, almost 31 percent of working Americans had manufacturing jobs. Now the figure is below 10 percent. Many analysts put the blame on American companies that sent such jobs to low- and slave-wage nations during the offshoring wave that picked up momentum in the 1980s and hasn’t stopped. Controversy rages.

There is plenty of bitterness, too, about the H-1B visa program that flows the other way: well-educated foreigners come to the United States and take good jobs, largely in high tech. Congress set up the program in 1990, although its roots go as far back as 1952. Under H-1B, foreigners with at least a bachelor’s degree take jobs in a variety of fields including biotech and law. Their three-year stay can be extended to six, and longer under some circumstances. Originally, H-1B visas were to be limited to 65,000 a year; that number was extended to 195,000 for 2001–2003. In 2008, 276,000 visas were issued.

The rationale is that there is a shortage of trained Americans for such employment. Nonsense, howl American engineers. The importation of foreign workers is just one more method to keep wages down and profits up, they claim. The United States Department of Labor is supposed to make sure that foreign workers do not displace Americans or adversely affect their wages. But American tech workers say the department is failing at both tasks.

The late Nobel Prize–winning economist Milton Friedman called H-1B a corporate subsidy. “It’s corporate welfare,” says Norman Matloff, professor of computer science at the University of California Davis. The H-1B program “is fundamentally about cheap labor,” he says. Foreign workers are often paid less than their American counterparts. “Most H-1Bs are under 30, and since younger workers are cheaper than older ones in both wages and health care costs, employers use the H-1B program to avoid hiring older [those over 35 years of age] Americans,” Matloff says on his website.

San Diego–based telecom Qualcomm, the biggest local tech employer (except hospitals), is the eighth-largest American corporate user of this program, according to the publications Bloomberg Businessweek, Computerworld, and InformationWeek. The others, in order, are prominent techs, accounting firms, and consulting firms: Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, Intel, Ernst & Young, UST Global, and Deloitte Consulting.

“Qualcomm is in the forefront of lobbying in favor of H-1B,” says Matloff. “It’s in the vanguard, one of the most vociferous lobbyists for it.”

I asked Qualcomm a number of questions, such as: Is there a shortage of tech engineers, particularly software engineers, that makes H-1B necessary? What percentage of Qualcomm’s workforce comes from the H-1B program? How much does Qualcomm spend lobbying for H-1B? Are those who come to the United States underpaid and thus contributing to a decline in wages for American engineers?

After several days of cogitation, the company would only say, “Qualcomm utilizes the H-1B program as necessary to recruit and retain the best talent in the world. We support bipartisan, sensible reform of the employment-based immigration system so that U.S. employers continue to have access to the talent they need to innovate, create American jobs and grow the U.S. economy.” Qualcomm is a member of Compete America, which pushes for the H-1B program. Qualcomm sent me some of Compete America’s literature, along with arguments compiled by another advocacy group, the National Foundation for American Policy.

In an interview with Wired.com in 2008, Qualcomm chief executive Paul Jacobs estimated that 60 percent of the university graduates the company hires are born abroad.

In January, the U.S. Government Accountability Office completed a study of the H-1B program. Congress had asked the agency to see if H-1B helped corporate innovation or harmed American workers. The agency concluded that the number of H-1B workers at any given time is unknowable because of flaws in the tracking system. The agency found a small percentage of instances in which the foreign worker was being paid less than the prevailing wage. The Department of Labor gives only a cursory look at H-1B applications, the study found. And there is no legal provision for holding employers accountable when they hire foreign workers through staffing companies. Generally, the report’s findings represented classic bureaucratic waffling.

The most interesting finding was that 46.9 percent of the workers come from India and 8.9 percent from China.

The National Foundation for American Policy proclaimed that the study undermined the assertion that companies hire H-1B professionals only because they will work cheaply. Adjusted for age, the foreign workers earn the same or more than their American counterparts, according to the foundation, citing the study. Matloff, however, cites two congressional studies and academic reports showing that H-1B workers are often paid less than Americans.

Senators Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and Dick Durbin, D-Illinois, have cosponsored a bill seeking to end alleged loopholes in the program. Citing long-running “fraud and abuse” in the H-1B program, Grassley says, “It’s time we get the program back to its original intent where employers use H-1B visas only to shore up employment in areas where there is a lack of qualified American workers.” The proposed law would tighten up enforcement in several areas.

One former Qualcomm employee says he was in a group of 30 engineers, 20 of whom were Indian nationals, mostly H-1Bs. “I don’t think I am being racist, but it was tough to fit into a group that had their own culture and social dynamic,” he says, quoting a fellow worker who called the system “modern-day indentured servitude.” Other critics have used the same language. This ex-employee says he has “a soft spot for immigration” because his parents came from foreign countries. However, “companies take advantage of this [H-1B] process to fill their workforce with people who can’t easily change jobs and work hard and keep their mouths shut, since they’re afraid of losing their jobs and status.”

Another former employee who reapplied during the recent downturn claims that 80 percent of Qualcomm engineers are foreigners brought in during the past ten years — mostly from India. He claims that he had a job interview with a manager who was an Indian national. The former employee was told he was “too senior” with too much job experience, he says, and the interview was aborted. I asked Qualcomm about that, but it was one of the many questions that went unanswered. “I grew up being antiunion and a conservative Republican, but nowadays I’m seeing global labor being exploited by large companies to such an extent that I feel that labor protections are needed,” says this engineer.

Sorrento Valley, where Qualcomm is located, has picked up the sobriquet “Little Calcutta.” That smacks of xenophobia, but at some point, it seems, the company may have to give more information on its H-1B program to American engineers.

Meanwhile, in other news the Collaborator Coward Don Tennant, aka "Mumbai Don", has seen fit to wade into the globalist gladiator pit and chime in on the Dice boards:

Regarding this statement:

"Don salivates all over the Brokaw piece, and paints all H1B critics as 'Tunnel Rats.'"

I suspect that many people don't know that "Tunnel Rat" is the pseudonym used by one of the more extreme readers who posted comments. I trust it was unintended, but your statement could imply that I refer to all H1B critics as "Tunnel Rats." I have never used, and would never use, the term. If you are familiar with my writings, I trust you know that. You also took the liberty of changing my qualifier in referring to the more extreme readers from  "way too many" to "all." Do not make up positions that I do not hold and attribute them to me.

In response to your question, I'm comfortable that my position is fully explained in my post. I'm confident that any fair-minded person who reads the post will find your comments unsettling.

Don Tennant

 dontennant1@gmail.com

What a douchebag Don Tennant is.  He banned me from his blog because he didn't like the rhetorical race war his flame-baiting posts were inciting.  I am sure his ITBusinessEdge sponsors at MSFT, HP, and QCOM didn't like to see their ads adjacent to comments attacking the slumdog slave trade.

Feel free to drop him a line, insurgents.

There will be retribution for that collaborator.



- Vineet Nayar, CEO, HCL Technologies

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